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The OSSU curriculum is a complete education in computer science using online materials.It's not merely for career training or professional development.

It's for those who want a proper, well-rounded grounding in concepts fundamental to all computing disciplines, and for those who have the discipline, will, and (most importantly!) good habits to obtain this education largely on their own, but with support from a worldwide community of fellow learners 3 Apr 2013 - You might be studying the function and regulation of membrane proteins or doing a computational analysis of the conductivity of different battery designs, but that doesn't mean your PhD project must revolve around similar projects. The transition between college or another research job to a PhD program is  .It's for those who want a proper, well-rounded grounding in concepts fundamental to all computing disciplines, and for those who have the discipline, will, and (most importantly!) good habits to obtain this education largely on their own, but with support from a worldwide community of fellow learners.

It is designed according to the degree requirements of undergraduate computer science majors, minus general education (non-CS) requirements, as it is assumed most of the people following this curriculum are already educated outside the field of CS.The courses themselves are among the very best in the world, often coming from Harvard, Princeton, MIT, etc Internships complement coursework by allowing students to work intensively on a single project using modern technology. Likewise, capstones are   Ph.D. in CSE Robotics and Control Systems Scientific Computing Security Systems Development Software Engineering User Interface and Human-Computer Interaction.The courses themselves are among the very best in the world, often coming from Harvard, Princeton, MIT, etc., but specifically chosen to meet the following criteria.Courses must: Fit neatly into the progression of the curriculum with respect to topics and difficulty level Be of generally high quality in teaching materials and pedagogical principles When no course meets the above criteria, the coursework is supplemented with a book .

Courses must: Fit neatly into the progression of the curriculum with respect to topics and difficulty level Be of generally high quality in teaching materials and pedagogical principles When no course meets the above criteria, the coursework is supplemented with a book.

When there are courses or books that don't fit into the curriculum but are otherwise of high quality, they belong in extras/courses or extras/readings .When there are courses or books that don't fit into the curriculum but are otherwise of high quality, they belong in extras/courses or extras/readings.The curriculum is designed as follows: Intro CS: for students to try out CS and see if it's right for them Core CS: corresponds roughly to the first three years of a computer science curriculum, taking classes that all majors would be required to take Advanced CS: corresponds roughly to the final year of a computer science curriculum, taking electives according to the student's interests Final Project: a project for students to validate, consolidate, and display their knowledge, to be evaluated by their peers worldwide Pro CS: graduate-level specializations students can elect to take after completing the above curriculum if they want to maximize their chances of getting a good job Duration.It is possible to finish Core CS within about 2 years if you plan carefully and devote roughly 18-22 hours/week to your studies.

Courses in Core CS should be taken linearly if possible, but since a perfectly linear progression is rarely possible, each class's prerequisites is specified so that you can design a logical but non-linear progression based on the class schedules and your own life plans.

All or nearly all course material prior to Pro CS is available for free, however some courses may charge money for assignments/tests/projects to be graded.Note that Coursera offers financial aid.Decide how much or how little to spend based on your own time and budget; just remember that you can't purchase success! Content policy.If you plan on showing off some of your coursework publicly, you must share only files that you are allowed to.

Do NOT disrespect the code of conduct that you signed in the beginning of each course! How to contribute.Please check our Frequently Asked Questions, and if you cannot find the answer, file an issue or talk to our friendly community! Curriculum Prerequisites Core CS assumes the student has already taken high school math and physics, including algebra, geometry, and pre-calculus.Some high school graduates will have already taken AP Calculus, but this is usually only about 3/4 of a college calculus class, so the calculus courses in the curriculum are still recommended.

Advanced CS assumes the student has already taken the entirety of Core CS and is knowledgeable enough now to decide which electives to take.Note that Advanced systems assumes the student has taken a basic physics course (e.Introduction to Computer Science These courses will introduce you to the world of computer science.

Both are required, but feel free to skip straight to the second course when CS50 (the first course) moves away from C.(Why?) Topics covered: After completing every required course in Core CS, students should choose a subset of courses from Advanced CS based on interest.Not every course from a subcategory needs to be taken.But students should take every course that is relevant to the field they intend to go into.The Advanced CS study should then end with one of the Specializations under Advanced applications.

A Specialization's Capstone, if taken, may act as the Final project, if permitted by the Honor Code of the course.If not, or if a student chooses not to take the Capstone, then a separate Final project will need to be done to complete this curriculum.Advanced programming OSS University is project-focused.You are encouraged to do the assignments and exams for each course, but what really matters is whether you can use your knowledge to solve a real world problem.After you've gotten through all of Core CS and the parts of Advanced CS relevant to you, you should think about a problem that you can solve using the knowledge you've acquired.

Not only does real project work look great on a resume, the project will validate and consolidate your knowledge.You can create something entirely new, or you can find an existing project that needs help via websites like CodeTriage or First Timers Only.Another option is using the Capstone project from taking one of the Specializations in Advanced applications; whether or not this makes sense depends on the course, the project, and whether or not the course's Honor Code permits you to display your work publicly.Your peers and mentors from OSSU will then informally evaluate your project.

You will not be "graded" in the traditional sense — everyone has their own measurements for what they consider a success.The purpose of the evaluation is to act as your first announcement to the world that you are a computer scientist, and to get experience listening to feedback — both positive and negative — and taking it in stride.The final project evaluation has a second purpose: to evaluate whether OSSU, through its community and curriculum, is successful in its mission to guide independent learners in obtaining a world-class computer science education.Cooperative work You can create this project alone or with other students! We love cooperative work! Use our channels to communicate with other fellows to combine and create new projects! Which programming languages should I use? My friend, here is the best part of liberty! You can use any language that you want to complete the final project.The important thing is to internalize the core concepts and to be able to use them with whatever tool (programming language) that you wish.

Pro CS After completing the requirements of the curriculum above, you will have completed the equivalent of a full bachelor's degree in Computer Science, or quite close to one.You can stop in the Advanced CS section, but the next step to completing your studies is to develop skills and knowledge in a specific domain.Many of these courses are graduate-level.Choose one or more of the following specializations: Use our forum if you need some help.You can also interact through GitHub issues.

We also have a chat room! Add Open Source Society University to your Linkedin and Facebook profile! PS: A forum is an ideal way to interact with other students as we do not lose important discussions, which usually occur in communication via chat apps.Please use our forum for important discussions.How to show your progress Create an account in Trello.Copy this board to your personal account.Now that you have a copy of our official board, you just need to pass the cards to the Doing column or We also have labels to help you have more control through the process.The meaning of each of these labels is: Main Curriculum: cards with that label represent courses that are listed in our curriculum.Extra Resources: cards with that label represent courses that was added by the student.Doing: cards with that label represent courses the student is current doing.

Done: cards with that label represent courses finished by the student.

Those cards should also have the link for at least one project/article built with the knowledge acquired in such course.Section: cards with that label represent the section that we have in our curriculum.Those cards with the Section label are only to help the organization of the Done column.You should put the Course's cards below its respective Section's card.The intention of this board is to provide our students a way to track their progress, and also the ability to show their progress through a public page for friends, family, employers, etc.

You can change the status of your board to be public or About the Program The Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS) offers two graduate programs in Computer Science: the Master of Science (MS), and the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD).Master of Science (MS) The Master of Science (MS) emphasizes research preparation and experience and, for most students, is a chance to lay the groundwork for pursuing a PhD.Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) The Berkeley PhD in EECS combines coursework and original research with some of the finest EECS faculty in the US preparing for careers in academia or industry.Our alumni have gone on to hold amazing positions around the world.Minimum Requirements for Admission The following minimum requirements apply to all graduate programs and will be verified by the Graduate Division: A bachelor’s degree or recognized equivalent from an accredited institution; A grade point average of B or better (3.

0); If the applicant comes from a country or political entity (e., Quebec) where English is not the official language, adequate proficiency in English to do graduate work, as evidenced by a TOEFL score of at least 90 on the iBT test, 570 on the paper-and-pencil test, or an IELTS Band score of at least 7 (note that individual programs may set higher levels for any of these); and Sufficient undergraduate training to do graduate work in the given field.Applicants Who Already Hold a Graduate Degree The Graduate Council views academic degrees not as vocational training certificates, but as evidence of broad training in research methods, independent study, and articulation of learning.Therefore, applicants who already have academic graduate degrees should be able to pursue new subject matter at an advanced level without need to enroll in a related or similar graduate program.

Programs may consider students for an additional academic master’s or professional master’s degree only if the additional degree is in a distinctly different field.

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Applicants admitted to a doctoral program that requires a master’s degree to be earned at Berkeley as a prerequisite (even though the applicant already has a master’s degree from another institution in the same or a closely allied field of study) will be permitted to undertake the second master’s degree, despite the overlap in field.The Graduate Division will admit students for a second doctoral degree only if they meet the following guidelines: Applicants with doctoral degrees may be admitted for an additional doctoral degree only if that degree program is in a general area of knowledge distinctly different from the field in which they earned their original degree.For example, a physics PhD could be admitted to a doctoral degree program in music or history; however, a student with a doctoral degree in mathematics would not be permitted to add a PhD in statistics detail to further develop my abilities in the field of computer science. EDUCATION:   COURSEWORK: Analysis I and II; Introduction to Programming; Concepts of Mathematics; Principles of Imperative. Programming, Great Theoretical Ideas in Computer Science   Association First Team, Eastern College Athletic Conference..For example, a physics PhD could be admitted to a doctoral degree program in music or history; however, a student with a doctoral degree in mathematics would not be permitted to add a PhD in statistics.

Applicants who hold the PhD degree may be admitted to a professional doctorate or professional master’s degree program if there is no duplication of training involved.

Applicants may apply only to one single degree program or one concurrent degree program per admission cycle.Required Documents for Applications If the applicant is admitted, thenofficial transcripts of all college-level work will be required Computer Science Stanford University.Required Documents for Applications If the applicant is admitted, thenofficial transcripts of all college-level work will be required.Official transcripts must be in sealed envelopes as issued by the school(s) attended. If you have attended Berkeley, upload your unofficial transcript with your application for the departmental initial review.If you are admitted, an official transcript with evidence of degree conferralwill not be required.

Letters of recommendation: Applicants may request online letters of recommendation through the online application system.Hard copies of recommendation letters must be sent directly to the program, not the Graduate Division.Evidence of English language proficiency: All applicants from countries or political entities in which the official language is not English are required to submit official evidence of English language proficiency.This applies to applicants from Bangladesh, Burma, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Latin America, the Middle East, the People’s Republic of China, Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia, most European countries, and Quebec (Canada).However, applicants who, at the time of application, have already completed at least one year of full-time academic course work with grades of B or better at a US university may submit an official transcript from the US university to fulfill this requirement.

The following courses will not fulfill this requirement: courses in English as a Second Language, courses conducted in a language other than English, courses that will be completed after the application is submitted, and courses of a non-academic nature.If applicants have previously been denied admission to Berkeley on the basis of their English language proficiency, they must submit new test scores that meet the current minimum from one of the standardized tests.Where to Apply Admission to the Program The following items are required for admission to the Berkeley EECS MS/PhD program in addition to the University’s general graduate admissions requirements: GRE Scores: All three sections of the GRE are required.Send your scores electronically to Institution Code 4833.(Scores must be from the last five years.

) Statement of Purpose: Why are you applying for this program? What will you do during this degree program? What do you want to do after and how will this help you? Personal History Statement: What from your past made you decide to go into this field? And how will your personal history help you succeed in this program and your future goals? GPA: If you attended a university outside of the USA, please leave the GPA section blank.Resume: Please also include a full resume/CV listing your experience and education.Complete the online UC Berkeley graduate application: Start your application through this link, and fill in each relevant page.Upload the materials above, and send the recommender links several weeks prior to the application deadline, to give your recommenders time to submit their letters.Doctoral Degree Requirements Oral Examination The oral exam serves an advisory role in a student's graduate studies program, giving official feedback from the exam committee of faculty members.

Students must be able to demonstrate an integrated grasp of the exam area's body of knowledge in an unstructured framework.Students must pass the oral portion of the preliminary exam within their first two attempts.A third attempt is possible with a petition of support from the student's faculty adviser and final approval by the prelim committee chair.Failure to pass the oral portion of the preliminary exam will result in the student being ineligible to complete the PhD program.The examining committee awards a score in the range of 0-10.

Breadth Courses The breadth courses ensure that students have an exposure to areas outside of their concentration.It is expected that students achieve high academic standards in these courses.

CS students must complete courses from three of the following areas, passing each with at least a B+.

One course must be selected from the Theory, AI, or Graphics/HCI group; and one course must be selected from the Programming, Systems, or Architecture/VLSI group 1.1 COMPSCI 260B, COMPSCI 263, and EL ENG 219C cannot be used to fulfill this constraint, though they can be used to complete one of the three courses.Qualifying Examination (QE) The QE is an important checkpoint meant to show that a student is on a promising research track toward the PhD degree.It is a University examination, administered by the Graduate Council, with the specific purpose of demonstrating that "the student is clearly an expert in those areas of the discipline that have been specified for the examination, and that he or she can, in all likelihood, design and produce an acceptable dissertation." Despite such rigid criteria, faculty examiners recognize that the level of expertise expected is that appropriate for a third year graduate student who may be only in the early stages of a research project.

The EECS Department offers the qualifying exam in two formats: A or B.Students may choose the exam type of their choice after consultation with their adviser.Format A Students prepare a write-up and presentation summarizing a specific research area, preferably the one in which they intend to do their dissertation work.Their summary surveys that area and describes open and interesting research problems.They describe why they chose these problems and indicate what direction their research may take in the future.

They prepare to display expertise on both the topic presented and on any related material that the committee thinks is relevant.The student should talk (at least briefly) about any research progress to date (e., MS project, PhD research, or class project).Some evidence of the ability to do research is expected.

The committee shall evaluate students on the basis of their comprehension of the fundamental facts and principles that apply within their research area and the student’s ability to think incisively and critically about the theoretical and practical aspects of this field. Students must demonstrate command of the content and the ability to design and produce an acceptable dissertation.Format B This option includes the presentation and defense of a thesis proposal in addition to the requirements of format A.It will include a summary of research to date and plans for future work (or at least the next stage thereof).The committee shall not only evaluate the student's thesis proposal and his/her progress to date, but shall also evaluate according to format A.

As in format A, the student should prepare a single document and presentation, but in this case additional emphasis must be placed on research completed to date and plans for the remainder of the dissertation research.Thesis Proposal Defense Students not presenting a satisfactory thesis proposal defense, either because they took format A for the QE or because the material presented in an format B exam was not deemed a satisfactory proposal defense (although it may have sufficed to pass the QE), must write up and present a thesis proposal, which should include a summary of the research to date and plans for the remainder of the dissertation research.They should be prepared to discuss background and related areas, but the focus of the proposal should be on the progress made so far, and detailed plans for completing the thesis.The standard for continuing on with PhD research is that the proposal has sufficient merit to lead to a satisfactory dissertation.Another purpose of this presentation is for faculty to provide feedback on the quality of work to date.

For this step, the committee should consist of at least three members from EECS familiar with the research area, preferably including those on the dissertation committee.Normative Time in Candidacy Advancement to Candidacy Students must file the advancement form in the Graduate Office no later than the end of the semester following the one in which the qualifying exam was passed.In approving this application, Graduate Division approves the dissertation committee and will send a certificate of candidacy.Dissertation Talk As part of the requirements for the doctoral degree, students must give a public talk on the research covered by their dissertation.The dissertation talk is to be given a few months before the signing of the final submission of the dissertation.

The talk should cover all the major components of the dissertation work in a substantial manner; in particular, the dissertation talk should not omit topics that will appear in the dissertation but are incomplete at the time of the talk.The dissertation talk is to be attended by the whole dissertation committee, or, if this is not possible, by at least a majority of the members.Attendance at this talk is part of the committee's responsibility.It is, however, the responsibility of the student to schedule a time for the talk that is convenient for members of the committee.Required Professional Development Graduate Student Instructor Teaching Requirement The department requires all PhD candidates to serve as graduate student instructors (GSIs) within the EECS department.

The GSI teaching requirement not only helps to develop a student's communication skills, but it also makes a great contribution to the department's academic community.Students must fulfill this requirement by working as a GSI (excluding EL ENG 375 or COMPSCI 375) for a total of 30 hours minimum prior to graduation.At least 20 of those hours must be for an EE or CS undergraduate course.

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Master's Degree Requirements Advancement to Candidacy For both Plan I and Plan II MS students, students need to complete the departmental Advance to Candidacy form, have their research adviser sign it, and submit the form to the department.Once a student is advanced to candidacy, candidacy is valid for three years.

Capstone/Thesis (Plan I) Students planning to use Plan I for their MS Degree will need to follow the Graduate Division's “Thesis Filing Guidelines GitHub ossu computer science Path to a free self taught education in nbsp.Capstone/Thesis (Plan I) Students planning to use Plan I for their MS Degree will need to follow the Graduate Division's “Thesis Filing Guidelines.

" They will also need to complete the Graduate Division Advance to Candidacy form and submit this to the department no later than the end of the second week of classes of their final semester.Capstone/Master's Project (Plan II) Students planning to use Plan II for their MS Degree will need to produce an MS Plan II Title/Signature Page.There is no special formatting required for the body of the Plan II MS report unlike the Plan I MS thesis which must follow strict Graduate Division guidelines 19 Aug 2017 - 3.5 General Suggestions; 3.6 Students Entering who do not have an Electrical Engineering degree; 3.7 Supporting Coursework for the M.S. and Ph.D. Degrees   I would recommend that a student apply to 7-10 graduate ECE programs, so that there is a good chance to secure admission with full financial  .There is no special formatting required for the body of the Plan II MS report unlike the Plan I MS thesis which must follow strict Graduate Division guidelines.Courses Computer Science Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015 This course introduces students to the basics of models, analysis tools, and control for embedded systems operating in real time razestudios.net/dissertation.php.

Courses Computer Science Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015 This course introduces students to the basics of models, analysis tools, and control for embedded systems operating in real time.

Students learn how to combine physical processes with computation.Topics include models of computation, control, analysis and verification, interfacing with the physical world, mapping to platforms, and distributed embedded systems.The course has a strong laboratory component, with emphasis on a semester-long sequence of projects.Introduction to Embedded Systems: Read More + Rules & Requirements Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Electrical Engineering/Computer Science C249A after completing Electrical Engineering/Computer Science C149.

Hours & Format Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week Additional Details Grading: Letter grade.

Hours & Format Summer: 8 weeks - 4 hours of discussion per week Additional Details Grading: Offered for satisfactory/unsatisfactory grade only.Instructors: Barsky, Garcia, Harvey COMPSCI 399 Professional Preparation: Supervised Teaching of Computer Science 1 or 2 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015 Discussion, problem review and development, guidance of computer science laboratory sections, course development, supervised practice teaching.Professional Preparation: Supervised Teaching of Computer Science: Read More + Rules & Requirements Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit.Hours & Format Summer: 8 weeks - 1-2 hours of independent study per week Additional Details Grading: Offered for satisfactory/unsatisfactory grade only.Professional Preparation: Supervised Teaching of Computer Science: Read Less - COMPSCI 602 Individual Study for Doctoral Students 1 - 8 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Spring 2014 Individual study in consultation with the major field adviser, intended to provide an opportunity for qualified students to prepare themselves for the various examinations required of candidates for the Ph.

Individual Study for Doctoral Students: Read More + Rules & Requirements Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit.Hours & Format Summer: 8 weeks - 6-45 hours of independent study per week Additional Details Grading: Offered for satisfactory/unsatisfactory grade only.Individual Study for Doctoral Students: Read Less - Electrical Engineering Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015 An introduction to the kinematics, dynamics, and control of robot manipulators, robotic vision, and sensing.

The course will cover forward and inverse kinematics of serial chain manipulators, the manipulator Jacobian, force relations, dynamics and control-position, and force control.Network modeling, stability, and fidelity in teleoperation and medical applications of robotics.Introduction to Robotics: Read More + Rules & Requirements Prerequisites: 120 or equivalent, or consent of instructor Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for 206A after taking C125/Bioengineering C125 or EE C106A Hours & Format Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture, 1 hour of discussion, and 3 hours of laboratory per week Additional Details Grading: Letter grade.5 hours of independent study per week Additional Details Grading: Offered for satisfactory/unsatisfactory grade only.Individual Research: Read Less - Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017 Discussion of effective teaching techniques.Use of educational objectives, alternative forms of instruction, and proven techniques to enhance student learning.This course is intended to orient new student instructors to more effectively teach courses offered by the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at UC Berkeley.

Teaching Techniques for Electrical Engineering: Read More + Rules & Requirements Hours & Format Additional Details Grading: Offered for satisfactory/unsatisfactory grade only.Teaching Techniques for Electrical Engineering: Read Less - EL ENG 602 Individual Study for Doctoral Students 1 - 8 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014 Individual study in consultation with the major field adviser, intended to provide an opportunity for qualified students to prepare themselves for the various examinations required of candidates for the Ph.Individual Study for Doctoral Students: Read More + Rules & Requirements Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit.

Hours & Format Summer: 8 weeks - 6-45 hours of independent study per week Additional Details Grading: Offered for satisfactory/unsatisfactory grade only.Individual Study for Doctoral Students: Read Less - Faculty and Instructors Faculty Dean Doyle on Berkeley Graduate Education "Berkeley didn't just show me doors that I didn't know existed, it opened them up and helped me through them."Learn More Berkeley Research Our world-class faculty and researchers are changing the way we understand and interact with the More SMART Mentoring The Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) program matches graduate students with undergrads to assist in their original research and provides critical summer More Berkeley Graduate Lectures Watch, listen, and learn.Since 1909, distinguished guests have visited UC Berkeley to speak on a wide range of topics, from philosophy to the More Disabled Students' Program We are committed to ensuring that all students have equal access to educational opportunities at UC More There are two ways to study Computer Science (CS) at UC Berkeley: Be admitted to the Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences (EECS) major in the College of Engineering (COE) as a freshman.Admission to the COE, however, is extremely competitive.

This option leads to a Bachelor of Science (BS) degree. This path is appropriate for people who want an engineering education.Enter the College of Letters & Science (L&S) and, after successful completion of the courses required to declare with the minimum grade point average (GPA), petition to be admitted to the L&S Computer Science major.This path is appropriate for people who are interested in a broader education in the sciences and arts (such as double majoring in other L&S fields), and/or are not sure at the time of application that they can gain admission to EECS.This option leads to a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree.

There is no difference in the CS course content between the BS and BA programs.The difference is in what else you take: mainly engineering, or mainly humanities and social sciences.In particular, an interest in hardware suggests the EECS route; an interest in double majoring (for example, in math or cognitive science) suggests the L&S route.Bachelor of Science (BS) in Computer Science For information regarding the BS degree, please see the Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences program information in this Guide.Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Computer Science This CS major is for students enrolled in the College of Letters & Science (L&S).

 Berkeley emphasizes the science of computer science, which means much more than just computer programming.It includes the theory of computation, the design and analysis of algorithms, the architecture and logic design of computers, programming languages, compilers, operating systems, scientific computation, computer graphics, databases, artificial intelligence, and natural language processing.Our goal is to prepare students both for a possible research career and long-term technical leadership in industry.We must therefore look beyond today's technology and give students the primary ideas and the learning skills that will prepare them to teach themselves about tomorrow's technology.Declaring the Major (BA only) It is necessary to achieve a minimum prerequisite grade point average (GPA) in order to declare the Computer Science major.

Information on this GPA and the process to petition for admission to the major can be found on the Petitioning to the Computer Science Major website.Transfer students admitted to Berkeley must apply separately to the Computer Science major after matriculating and completing the missing prerequisite courses for declaration.Not all transfer students will meet the criteria required for the major.Therefore, we recommend that transfer students be prepared to pursue an alternative major at Berkeley.

Questions may be directed to the CS advising office, 379 Soda Hall, 510-664-4436, or via email at [email protected] .

Five-Year BS/MS Program This program is geared toward students who would like to pursue an education beyond the BS/BA, allowing them to achieve greater breadth and/or depth of knowledge, and who would like to try their hand at research as well. For information, please see the Five-Year BS/MS Requirements tab on this page.Honors Program Computer Science majors with an overall GPA of 3.70 or above are eligible to apply to the EECS honors degree program.Minor Program A minor in Computer Science is available to all undergraduate students at Berkeley with a declared major, with the exception of EECS majors.

For information regarding minor requirements, please see the Minor Requirements tab on this page.Major Requirements (BA) In addition to the University, campus, and college requirements, listed on the College Requirements tab, students must fulfill the below requirements specific to their major program.General Guidelines All courses taken to fulfill the major requirements below must be 3 or more units and taken for a letter grade.All courses for the major must be technical in nature.Courses numbered 199, 198, 197, 196, 195, plus select 194, 191, 190, and various seminars do not count.

If you are unsure, please check with the CS advisers ([email protected] ).Only one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student's major and minor programs. No more than two upper division courses can overlap between two majors.A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.

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0 must be maintained in both upper and lower division courses used to fulfill the major requirements.

For information regarding residence requirements and unit requirements, please see the College Requirements tab.Lower Division Prerequisites Five-Year BS/MS This program is geared toward students who would like to pursue an education beyond the BS/BA, allowing them to achieve greater breadth and/or depth of knowledge, and who would like to try their hand at research as well 1.1 TERMINAL M.S. /M.S.E. DEGREE PROGRAM IN COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING .   A student must earn at least 30 credit hours of graduate level coursework, of which at least 24 hours must be   The option of writing a Master's thesis is available to master's students in good academic standing. A..Lower Division Prerequisites Five-Year BS/MS This program is geared toward students who would like to pursue an education beyond the BS/BA, allowing them to achieve greater breadth and/or depth of knowledge, and who would like to try their hand at research as well.

It is not intended for students who have definitely decided to pursue a PhD immediately following graduation.Those students are advised to apply for a PhD program at Berkeley or elsewhere during their senior year 25 Sep 2014 - In my PhD program, I was required to register for various research and dissertation related courses to fill the required 9 credit hours to be a full-time student.   credit hours I took, never really aligned with much, except that a 3-credit hour actual course (like  Functional Analysis ) met for 3 hours every week..Those students are advised to apply for a PhD program at Berkeley or elsewhere during their senior year.Students who have been accepted into the Five-Year BA/MS or BS/MS are free to change their minds later and apply to enter the PhD program or apply to a PhD program at another university.

Note that admission is competitive with all our PhD applicants.The program is focused on interdisciplinary training at a graduate level; with at least 8 units of course work outside EECS required razestudios.net/dissertation/repair-technologies.php.The program is focused on interdisciplinary training at a graduate level; with at least 8 units of course work outside EECS required.Students will emerge as leaders in their technical and professional fields.Focused on interdisciplinary study and more experience in aligned technical fields such as physics, materials science, statistics, biology, etc., and/or professional disciplines such as management of technology, business, law, and public policy.

If admitted to the program, students must begin the graduate portion in the semester immediately following the conferral of the bachelor's degree.Only one additional year (two semesters) beyond the bachelor's degree.Only available to Berkeley EECS and L&S CS undergraduates.Participants in the program may serve as graduate student instructors (GSIs) with approval from their faculty research adviser and the Five-Year MS Committee.Participants in the program are self-funded.

For further information regarding this program, please see the department's website Minor Requirements Students who have a strong interest in an area of study outside their major often decide to complete a minor program. These programs have set requirements and are noted officially on the transcript in the memoranda section, but are not noted on diplomas.General Guidelines All courses taken to fulfill the minor requirements below must be taken for graded credit.A minimum of three of the upper division courses taken to fulfill the minor requirements must be completed at UC Berkeley.A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.

0 is required for courses used to fulfill the minor requirements.Courses used to fulfill the minor requirements may be applied toward the Seven-Course Breadth requirement, for Letters & Science students.No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student's major and minor programs.All minor requirements must be completed prior to the last day of finals during the semester in which you plan to graduate.If you cannot finish all courses required for the minor by that time, please see a College of Letters & Science adviser.

All minor requirements must be completed within the unit ceiling.(For further information regarding the unit ceiling, please see the College Requirements tab.) Requirements American Cultures is the one requirement that all undergraduate students at Cal need to take and pass in order to graduate.The requirement offers an exciting intellectual environment centered on the study of race, ethnicity and culture of the United States.AC courses offer students opportunities to be part of research-led, highly accomplished teaching environments, grappling with the complexity of American Culture.

Quantitative Reasoning The Quantitative Reasoning requirement is designed to ensure that students graduate with basic understanding and competency in math, statistics, or computer science.The requirement may be satisfied by exam or by taking an approved course.Foreign Language The Foreign Language requirement may be satisfied by demonstrating proficiency in reading comprehension, writing, and conversation in a foreign language equivalent to the second semester college level, either by passing an exam or by completing approved course work.Reading and Composition In order to provide a solid foundation in reading, writing, and critical thinking the College requires two semesters of lower division work in composition in sequence.

Students must complete a first-level reading and composition course by the end of their second semester and a second-level course by the end of their fourth semester.

Breadth Requirements The undergraduate breadth requirements provide Berkeley students with a rich and varied educational experience outside of their major program.As the foundation of a liberal arts education, breadth courses give students a view into the intellectual life of the University while introducing them to a multitude of perspectives and approaches to research and scholarship.Engaging students in new disciplines and with peers from other majors, the breadth experience strengthens interdisciplinary connections and context that prepares Berkeley graduates to understand and solve the complex issues of their day.Unit Requirements Of the 120 units, 36 must be upper division units Of the 36 upper division units, 6 must be taken in courses offered outside your major department Residence Requirements For units to be considered in "residence," you must be registered in courses on the Berkeley campus as a student in the College of Letters & Science.Most students automatically fulfill the residence requirement by attending classes here for four years.

In general, there is no need to be concerned about this requirement, unless you go abroad for a semester or year or want to take courses at another institution or through UC Extension during your senior year.In these cases, you should make an appointment to meet an adviser to determine how you can meet the Senior Residence Requirement.Note: Courses taken through UC Extension do not count toward residence.Senior Residence Requirement After you become a senior (with 90 semester units earned toward your BA degree), you must complete at least 24 of the remaining 30 units in residence in at least two semesters.To count as residence, a semester must consist of at least 6 passed units.

Intercampus Visitor, EAP, and UC Berkeley-Washington Program (UCDC) units are excluded.You may use a Berkeley Summer Session to satisfy one semester of the Senior Residence requirement, provided that you successfully complete 6 units of course work in the Summer Session and that you have been enrolled previously in the college.Modified Senior Residence Requirement Participants in the UC Education Abroad Program (EAP) or the UC Berkeley Washington Program (UCDC) may meet a Modified Senior Residence requirement by completing 24 (excluding EAP) of their final 60 semester units in residence.At least 12 of these 24 units must be completed after you have completed 90 units.Upper Division Residence Requirement You must complete in residence a minimum of 18 units of upper division courses (excluding EAP units), 12 of which must satisfy the requirements for your major.

UC and Campus Requirements Course Definitions Upper Division major CS major course: course meeting the 20 units of upper division CS requirement (at least one of these must be a Design Course).Upper Division major technical elective: course meeting the 7 units of technical electives requirement.This plan assumes that the student has completed the Entry Level Writing, American History and Institutions, Quantitative Reasoning, and Foreign Language requirements prior to admission.• Students are strongly advised to work with an academic adviser to determine a personal program plan.

Your program plan will differ depending on previous credit received, your course schedule, and available offerings.• Accelerated Program Plans For students considering graduating in less than four years, it's important to acknowledge the reasons to undertake such a plan of study.While there are advantages to pursuing a three-year degree plan such as reducing financial burdens, they are not for everyone and do involve sacrifices; especially with respect to participating in co-curricular activities, depth of study,and summer internships, which typically lead to jobs upon graduation.All things considered, please see the tables for three and three and a half year degree options.Plan of Study (BS) For more detailed information regarding the courses listed below (e.

, elective information, GPA requirements, etc.), please see the Major Requirements tab.Freshman 1 Students must complete one course from the following list: ASTRON 7A, ASTRON 7B, BIOLOGY 1A and BIOLOGY 1AL (must take both), BIOLOGY 1B, CHEM 1A and CHEM 1AL (must take both), CHEM 1B, CHEM 3A and CHEM 3AL (must take both), CHEM 3B and CHEM 3BL (must take both), CHEM 4A, CHEM 4B, MCELLBI 32 and MCELLBI 32L (must take both), PHYSICS 7C, or an upper-division course of 3 units or more in astronomy, biology, chemistry, earth and planetary science (other than EPS 170AC), integrative biology, molecular cell biology, physics, or plant & microbial biology. This requirement is listed in the freshman year curriculum, but many of the options would not be appropriate for a first year student.

Complete this requirement in the semester when it is most appropriate to do so (i., take PHYSICS 7C after completing PHYSICS 7B).Your ESS or faculty adviser can help guide your selection on this requirement.2 3 Students must complete one course about engineering ethics or social implications of technology.

This may be fulfilled by completing one of the following courses: BIO ENG 100*, COMPSCI 195, COMPSCI H195, ENE,RES C100*, ENGIN 125*, ENGIN 157AC*, IAS 157AC*, ISF 100D*.

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Courses marked with an asterisk fulfill both a humanities/social science requirement and the EECS ethics/social implication of technology requirement.4 Students must complete a minimum of 45 units of engineering coursework.The 45 units of engineering courses cannot include: Any course taken on aPass/No Pass basis Courses numbered 24, 39, or 84 Accelerated Program Plans For students considering graduating in less than four years, it's important to acknowledge the reasons to undertake such a plan of study Computer Science Master's & Doctoral Program, Graduate.   The Berkeley PhD in EECS combines coursework and original research with some of the finest EECS faculty in the US preparing for careers in academia or industry. Our alumni have gone on to hold amazing positions around the world. Visit Department Website  .The 45 units of engineering courses cannot include: Any course taken on aPass/No Pass basis Courses numbered 24, 39, or 84 Accelerated Program Plans For students considering graduating in less than four years, it's important to acknowledge the reasons to undertake such a plan of study.

While there are advantages to pursuing a three-year degree plan such as reducing financial burdens, they are not for everyone and do involve sacrifices; especially with respect to participating in co-curricular activities, depth of study,and summer internships, which typically lead to jobs upon graduation.

All things considered, please see the tables for three and three and a half year degree options.Preparing graduates to pursue postgraduate education in electrical engineering, computer science, or related fields.Preparing graduates for success in technical careers related to electrical and computer engineering, or computer science and engineering.Preparing graduates to become leaders in fields related to electrical and computer engineering or computer science and engineering.Learning Goals for the Major An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.

An ability to configure, apply test conditions, and evaluate outcomes of experimental systems.An ability to design systems, components, or processes that conform to given specifications and cost constraints.An ability to work cooperatively, respectfully, creatively, and responsibly as a member of a team.An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.

An understanding of the norms of expected behavior in engineering practice and their underlying ethical foundations.

An ability to communicate effectively by oral, written, and graphical means.An awareness of global and societal concerns and their importance in developing engineering solutions.An ability to independently acquire and apply required information, and an appreciation of the associated process of lifelong learning.An in-depth ability to use a combination of software, instrumentation, and experimental techniques practiced in circuits, physical electronics, communication, networks and systems, hardware, programming, and computer science theory.

Courses EECS 47D Completion of work in Electrical Engineering 16A 1 - 3 Units Terms offered: Not yet offered This course allows students who have had a linear algebra and/or basic circuit theory course to complete the work in EE16A and be ready for EE16B or EE47E.The course focuses on the fundamentals of designing modern information devices and systems that interface with the real world and provides a comprehensive foundation for core EECS topics in signal processing, learning, control, and circuit design.Modeling is emphasized in a way that deepens mathematical maturity, and in both labs and homework, students will engage computationally, physically, and visually with the concepts being introduced in addition to traditional paper/pencil exercises.Completion of work in Electrical Engineering 16A: Read More + Rules & Requirements Prerequisites: Math 1A, Math 1B or equivalent, CS 61A or equivalent (encouraged to be taken concurrently), College level courses in linear algebra and/or circuit theory, and consent of the instructor Hours & Format Summer: 8 weeks - 4-13 hours of self-paced per week Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade.Instructors: Alon, Arcak, Ayazifar, Maharbiz, Niknejad, Ranade, Sahai, Subramanian, Tomlin Completion of work in Electrical Engineering 16A: Read Less - EECS 47E Completion of work in Electrical Engineering 16B 1 - 3 Units Terms offered: Not yet offered This course allows students who have had a linear algebra and/or basic circuit theory course to complete the work in EE16B.The course focuses on the fundamentals of designing modern information devices and systems that interface with the real world and provides a comprehensive foundation for core EECS topics in signal processing (DFT), learning (SVD/PCA), feedback control, and circuit design.Modeling is emphasized in a way that deepens mathematical maturity, and in both labs and homework, students will engage computationally, physically, and visually with the concepts being introduced in addition to traditional paper/pencil exercises.Completion of work in Electrical Engineering 16B: Read More + Rules & Requirements Prerequisites: Math 1A, Math 1B or equivalent, EE16A or EECS 47D or Math 54, CS 61A or equivalent, College level courses in linear algebra and/or circuit theory, and consent of the instructor Hours & Format Summer: 8 weeks - 6-16 hours of self-paced per week Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade.Instructors: Alon, Arcak, Ayazifar, Maharbiz, Niknejad, Ranade, Sahai, Subramanian, Tomlin Completion of work in Electrical Engineering 16B: Read Less - EECS 47F Completion of work in Computer Science 70 1 - 3 Units Terms offered: Not yet offered This course allows students who have had a discrete math and/or probability course to complete the work in CS70.Logic, infinity, and induction; applications include undecidability and stable marriage problem.Modular arithmetic and GCDs; applications include primality testing and cryptography.Polynomials; examples include error correcting codes and interpolation.Probability including sample spaces, independence, random variables, law of large numbers; examples include load balancing, existence arguments, Bayesian inference.

Completion of work in Computer Science 70: Read More + Rules & Requirements Prerequisites: Sophomore mathematical maturity, programming experience equivalent to that gained in 61A, a prior college level course on discrete math and/or probability, and consent of the instructor Hours & Format Summer: 8 weeks - 6-16 hours of self-paced per week Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade.Instructors: Ranade, Rao, Sahai, Seshia, Vazirani, Walrand Completion of work in Computer Science 70: Read Less - EECS C106A Introduction to Robotics 4 Units Terms offered: Fall 2017 An introduction to the kinematics, dynamics, and control of robot manipulators, robotic vision, and sensing.The course covers forward and inverse kinematics of serial chain manipulators, the manipulator Jacobian, force relations, dynamics, and control.It presents elementary principles on proximity, tactile, and force sensing, vision sensors, camera calibration, stereo construction, and motion detection.

The course concludes with current applications of robotics in active perception, medical robotics, and other areas.Introduction to Robotics: Read More + Rules & Requirements Prerequisites: Electrical Engineering 120 or equivalent, consent of instructor Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Electrical Engineering and Computer Science C106A/Bioengineering C106A after completing EE C106A/BioE C125, Electrical Engineering 206A, or Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 206A.Hours & Format Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture, 1 hour of discussion, and 3 hours of laboratory per week Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade.Instructor: Bajcsy Introduction to Robotics: Read Less - EECS C106B Robotic Manipulation and Interaction 4 Units Terms offered: Spring 2018 This course is a sequel to EECS C106A/Bioengineering C106A, which covers kinematics, dynamics and control of a single robot.

This course will cover dynamics and control of groups of robotic manipulators coordinating with each other and interacting with the environment.Concepts will include an introduction to grasping and the constrained manipulation, contacts and force control for interaction with the environment.We will also cover active perception guided manipulation, as well as the manipulation of non-rigid objects.Throughout, we will emphasize design and human-robot interactions, and applications to applications in manufacturing, service robotics, tele-surgery, and locomotion.Robotic Manipulation and Interaction: Read More + Rules & Requirements Prerequisites: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science C106A/Bioengineering C106A or consent of the instructor Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Electrical Engineering and Computer Science C106B/Bioengineering C106B after completing Electrical Engineering C106B/Bioengineering C125B, Electrical Engineering 206B, or Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 206B.

Hours & Format Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture, 1 hour of discussion, and 3 hours of laboratory per week Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade.Instructors: Bajcsy, Sastry Robotic Manipulation and Interaction: Read Less - EECS 126 Probability and Random Processes 4 Units Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017 This course covers the fundamentals of probability and random processes useful in fields such as networks, communication, signal processing, and control.Probability and Random Processes: Read More + Rules & Requirements Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for EECS 126 after completing EE 126.

Hours & Format Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade.

Instructor: Ramchandran EECS 127 Optimization Models in Engineering 4 Units Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017 This course offers an introduction to optimization models and their applications, ranging from machine learning and statistics to decision-making and control, with emphasis on numerically tractable problems, such as linear or constrained least-squares optimization.Optimization Models in Engineering: Read More + Rules & Requirements Prerequisites: EE 16A & 16B or consent of instructor Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for EECS 127 after taking EECS 227AT or Electrical Engineering 127/227AT.Hours & Format Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade.Instructor: El Ghaoui Optimization Models in Engineering: Read Less - EECS 149 Introduction to Embedded Systems 4 Units Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015 This course introduces students to the basics of modeling, analysis, and design of embedded, cyber-physical systems.Students learn how to integrate computation with physical processes to meet a desired specification.Topics include models of computation, control, analysis and verification, interfacing with the physical world, real-time behaviors, mapping to platforms, and distributed embedded systems.The course has a strong laboratory component, with emphasis on a semester-long sequence of projects.Introduction to Embedded Systems: Read More + Objectives Outcomes Course Objectives: To develop the skills to realize embedded systems that are safe, reliable, and efficient in their use of resources.

To learn how to model and design the joint dynamics of software, networks, and physical processes.To learn to think critically about technologies that are available for achieving such joint dynamics.Rules & Requirements Hours & Format Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade.Instructors: Seshia, Lee EECS 151 Introduction to Digital Design and Integrated Circuits 3 Units Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017 An introduction to digital and system design.

The material provides a top-down view of the principles, components, and methodologies for large scale digital system design.The underlying CMOS devices and manufacturing technologies are introduced, but quickly abstracted to higher-levels to focus the class on design of larger digital modules for both FPGAs (field programmable gate arrays) and ASICs (application specific integrated circuits).The class includes extensive use of industrial grade design automation and verification tools for assignments, labs and projects.The class has two lab options: ASIC Lab (EECS 151LA) and FPGA Lab (EECS 151LB).Students must enroll in at least one of the labs concurrently with the class.

Introduction to Digital Design and Integrated Circuits: Read More + Objectives Outcomes Course Objectives: The Verilog hardware description language is introduced and used.Basic digital system design concepts, Boolean operations/combinational logic, sequential elements and finite-state-machines, are described.Design of larger building blocks such as arithmetic units, interconnection networks, input/output units, as well as memory design (SRAM, Caches, FIFOs) and integration are also covered.Parallelism, pipelining and other micro-architectural optimizations are introduced.

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A number of physical design issues visible at the architecture level are covered as well, such as interconnects, power, and reliability.

Rules & Requirements Prerequisites: Electrical Engineering 16A & 16B Credit Restrictions: Students must enroll concurrently in at least one the lab flavors EECS151LA or EECS151LB.Students wishing to take a second lab flavor next term can sign-up only for that Lab section and receive a Letter grade .Students wishing to take a second lab flavor next term can sign-up only for that Lab section and receive a Letter grade.

The pre-requisite for “Lab-only” enrollment that term will be EECS151 from previous terms.Hours & Format Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade Help me write a coursework functional analysis British Harvard A4 (British/European) Master's.Hours & Format Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade.Instructors: Stojanovic, Wawrzynek EECS 151LA Application Specific Integrated Circuits Laboratory 2 Units Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017 This lab lays the foundation of modern digital design by first presenting the scripting and hardware description language base for specification of digital systems and interactions with tool flows.The labs are centered on a large design with the focus on rapid design space exploration.The lab exercises culminate with a project design, e., implementation of a three-stage RISC-V processor with a register file and caches.

The design is mapped to simulation and layout specification.Application Specific Integrated Circuits Laboratory: Read More + Objectives Outcomes Course Objectives: Software testing of digital designs is covered leading to a set of exercises that cover the design flow.Digital synthesis, floor-planning, placement and routing are covered, as well as tools to evaluate timing and power consumption.Chip-level assembly is covered, including instantiation of custom blocks: I/O pads, memories, PLLs, etc.Rules & Requirements Hours & Format Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade.

Instructors: Stojanovic, Wawrzynek EECS 151LB Field-Programmable Gate Array Laboratory 2 Units Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017 This lab covers the design of modern digital systems with Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platforms.A series of lab exercises provide the background and practice of digital design using a modern FPGA design tool flow.Digital synthesis, partitioning, placement, routing, and simulation tools for FPGAs are covered in detail.The labs exercises culminate with a large design project, e.

, an implementation of a full three-stage RISC-V processor system, with caches, graphics acceleration, and external peripheral components.The design is mapped and demonstrated on an FPGA hardware platform.Field-Programmable Gate Array Laboratory: Read More + Rules & Requirements Hours & Format Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade.

Instructors: Stojanovic, Wawrzynek Computer Science Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Summer 2017 8 Week Session Foundations of data science from three perspectives: inferential thinking, computational thinking, and real-world relevance.Given data arising from some real-world phenomenon, how does one analyze that data so as to understand that phenomenon? The course teaches critical concepts and skills in computer programming and statistical inference, in conjunction with hands-on analysis of real-world datasets, including economic data, document collections, geographical data, and social networks.It delves into social and legal issues surrounding data analysis, including issues of privacy and data ownership.Foundations of Data Science: Read More + Rules & Requirements Prerequisites: This course may be taken on its own, but students are encouraged to take it concurrently with a data science connector course (numbered 88 in a range of departments) Hours & Format Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3-3 hours of lecture and 2-2 hours of laboratory per week Summer: 8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture and 4 hours of laboratory per week Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade.Also listed as: INFO C8/STAT C8 Foundations of Data Science: Read Less - COMPSCI C8R Introduction to Computational Thinking with Data 3 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Not yet offered An introduction to computational thinking and quantitative reasoning, preparing students for further coursework, especially Foundations of Data Science (CS/Info/Stat C8).Emphasizes the use of computation to gain insight about quantitative problems with real data.Expressions, data types, collections, and tables in Python.Programming practices, abstraction, and iteration.Visualizing univariate and bivariate data with bar charts, histograms, plots, and maps.

Introduction to statistical concepts including averages and distributions, predicting one variable from another, association and causality, probability and probabilistic simulation.Relationship between numerical functions and graphs.Introduction to Computational Thinking with Data: Read More + Objectives Outcomes Course Objectives: C8R also includes quantitative reasoning concepts that aren’t covered in Data 8.These include certain topics in: principles of data visualization; simulation of random processes; and understanding numerical functions through their graphs.

This will help prepare students for computational and quantitative courses other than Data 8.C8R takes advantage of the complementarity of computing and quantitative reasoning to enliven abstract ideas and build students’ confidence in their ability to solve real problems with quantitative tools.Students learn computer science concepts and immediately apply them to plot functions, visualize data, and simulate random events.Foundations of Data Science (CS/Info/Stat C8, a.Data 8) is an increasingly popular class for entering students at Berkeley.Data 8 builds students’ computing skills in the first month of the semester, and students rely on these skills as the course progresses.For some students, particularly those with little prior exposure to computing, developing these skills benefits from further time and practice.C8R is a rapid introduction to Python programming, visualization, and data analysis, which will prepare students for success in Data 8.

Student Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to perform basic computations in Python, including working with tabular data.Students will be able to understand basic probabilistic simulations.Students will be able to understand the syntactic structure of Python code.Students will be able to use good practices in Python programming.Students will be able to use visualizations to understand univariate data and to identify associations or causal relationships in bivariate data.

Rules & Requirements Credit Restrictions: Students who have taken COMPSCI/INFO/STAT C8 will receive no credit for COMPSCI/STAT C8R.Hours & Format Summer: 6 weeks - 4 hours of lecture, 2 hours of discussion, and 4 hours of laboratory per week Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade.Instructor: Adhikari Introduction to Computational Thinking with Data: Read Less - COMPSCI 9A Matlab for Programmers 2 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017 Introduction to the constructs in the Matlab programming language, aimed at students who already know how to program.Matlab for Programmers: Read More + Rules & Requirements Prerequisites: Programming experience equivalent to that gained in Computer Science 10; familiarity with applications of matrix processing Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 units.Hours & Format Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only.Instructor: Hilfinger COMPSCI 9C C for Programmers 2 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017 Self-paced course in the C programming language for students who already know how to program.Computation, input and output, flow of control, functions, arrays, and pointers, linked structures, use of dynamic storage, and implementation of abstract data types.

C for Programmers: Read More + Rules & Requirements Prerequisites: Programming experience with pointers (or addresses in assembly language) and linked data structures equivalent to that gained in Computer Science 9B or 61A, or Engineering 7 Hours & Format Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only.Instructor: Hilfinger COMPSCI 9D Scheme and Functional Programming for Programmers 2 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015 Self-paced course in functional programming, using the Scheme programming language, for students who already know how to program.Recursion; higher-order functions; list processing; implementation of rule-based querying.Scheme and Functional Programming for Programmers: Read More + Rules & Requirements Hours & Format Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only.

Instructor: Hilfinger COMPSCI 9E Productive Use of the UNIX Environment 2 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017 Use of UNIX utilities and scripting facilities for customizing the programming environment, organizing files (possibly in more than one computer account), implementing a personal database, reformatting text, and searching for online resources.Productive Use of the UNIX Environment: Read More + Rules & Requirements Prerequisites: Programming experience similar to that gained in Computer Science 61A or Engineering 7; DOS or UNIX experience Hours & Format Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only.Instructor: Hilfinger COMPSCI 9F C++ for Programmers 2 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017 Self-paced introduction to the constructs provided in the C++ programming language for procedural and object-oriented programming, aimed at students who already know how to program.

C++ for Programmers: Read More + Rules & Requirements Hours & Format Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only.Instructor: Hilfinger COMPSCI 9G JAVA for Programmers 2 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017 Self-paced course in Java for students who already know how to program.Applets; variables and computation; events and flow of control; classes and objects; inheritance; GUI elements; applications; arrays, strings, files, and linked structures; exceptions; threads.JAVA for Programmers: Read More + Rules & Requirements Hours & Format Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only.

Instructor: Garcia COMPSCI 9H Python for Programmers 2 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017 Introduction to the constructs provided in the Python programming language, aimed at students who already know how to program.Flow of control; strings, tuples, lists, and dictionaries; CGI programming; file input and output; object-oriented programming; GUI elements.Python for Programmers: Read More + Rules & Requirements Hours & Format Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only.Instructor: Hilfinger COMPSCI 10 The Beauty and Joy of Computing 4 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Summer 2017 8 Week Session An introduction to the beauty and joy of computing.

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The history, social implications, great principles, and future of computing.Beautiful applications that have changed the world.How computing empowers discovery and progress in other fields students What are dissertation hours in the scope of degree nbsp.How computing empowers discovery and progress in other fields.

Relevance of computing to the student and society will be emphasized.

Students will learn the joy of programming a computer using a friendly, graphical language, and will complete a substantial team programming project related to their interests.The Beauty and Joy of Computing: Read More + Rules & Requirements Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for 10 after having taken W10, 61A, 61B, or 61C Best website to purchase a custom coursework functional analysis confidentiality 3 days American Academic Chicago/Turabian.The Beauty and Joy of Computing: Read More + Rules & Requirements Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for 10 after having taken W10, 61A, 61B, or 61C.Hours & Format Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture, 1 hour of discussion, and 4 hours of laboratory per week Summer: 8 weeks - 4 hours of lecture, 2 hours of discussion, and 8 hours of laboratory per week Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade.Instructors: Garcia, Hug COMPSCI W10 The Beauty and Joy of Computing 4 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Fall 2012 This course meets the programming prerequisite for 61A.

An introduction to the beauty and joy of computing.The history, social implications, great principles, and future of computing.Beautiful applications that have changed the world.How computing empowers discovery and progress in other fields.Relevance of computing to the student and society will be emphasized.

Students will learn the joy of programming a computer using a friendly, graphical language, and will complete a substantial team programming project related to their interests.The Beauty and Joy of Computing: Read More + Rules & Requirements Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for W10 after taking 10, 61A, 61B or 61C.A deficient grade in 10 may be removed by taking W10.Hours & Format Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of web-based lecture and 5 hours of web-based discussion per week Summer: 8 weeks - 4 hours of web-based lecture and 10 hours of web-based discussion per week Online: This is an online course.Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade.

Instructors: Garcia, Hug COMPSCI 36 CS Scholars Seminar: The Educational Climate in CS & CS61A technical discussions 2 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Spring 2018 Computer Science 36 is a seminar for CS Scholars who are concurrently taking CS61A: The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs.CS Scholars is a cohort-model program to provide support in exploring and potentially declaring a CS major for students with little to no computational background prior to coming to the university.CS 36 provides an introduction to the CS curriculum at UC Berkeley, and the overall CS landscape in both industry and academia—through the lens of accessibility and its relevance to diversity.Additionally, CS36 provides technical instruction to review concepts in CS61A, in order to support CS Scholars’ individual learning and success in the CS61A course.

CS Scholars Seminar: The Educational Climate in CS & CS61A technical discussions: Read More + Objectives Outcomes Student Learning Outcomes: Students will know where to find several support services including tutoring, advising, counseling, and career advice.Students will perform as well as possible in the CS61A prerequisite for the CS major.They will also have customized program plans for completing the major within four years.Rules & Requirements Hours & Format Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only.Instructor: Hunn COMPSCI 39 Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 2 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017 Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting.These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.Enrollment limits are set by the faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More + Rules & Requirements Prerequisites: Priority given to freshmen and sophomores Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.Hours & Format Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only.Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read Less - COMPSCI 39J Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.

5 - 4 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Fall 2010, Spring 2010, Fall 2009 Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting.

These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.Enrollment limits are set by the faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More + Rules & Requirements Hours & Format Additional Details Subject/Course Level: Computer Science/Undergraduate Grading/Final exam status: The grading option will be decided by the instructor when the class is offered.Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read Less - COMPSCI 39K Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.

5 - 4 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Spring 2013, Spring 2011, Spring 2010 Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting.These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.Enrollment limits are set by the faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More + Rules & Requirements Hours & Format Additional Details Subject/Course Level: Computer Science/Undergraduate Grading/Final exam status: The grading option will be decided by the instructor when the class is offered.Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read Less - COMPSCI 39M Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Fall 2008 Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting.These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.Enrollment limits are set by the faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More + Rules & Requirements Hours & Format Additional Details Subject/Course Level: Computer Science/Undergraduate Grading/Final exam status: The grading option will be decided by the instructor when the class is offered.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read Less - COMPSCI 39N Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Fall 2010, Fall 2009 Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting.These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.Enrollment limits are set by the faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More + Rules & Requirements Hours & Format Additional Details Subject/Course Level: Computer Science/Undergraduate Grading/Final exam status: The grading option will be decided by the instructor when the class is offered.Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read Less - COMPSCI 39P Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Fall 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2012 Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting.These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

Enrollment limits are set by the faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More + Rules & Requirements Hours & Format Additional Details Subject/Course Level: Computer Science/Undergraduate Grading/Final exam status: The grading option will be decided by the instructor when the class is offered.Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read Less - COMPSCI 39Q Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Fall 2011 Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting.

These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.Enrollment limits are set by the faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More + Rules & Requirements Hours & Format Additional Details Subject/Course Level: Computer Science/Undergraduate Grading/Final exam status: The grading option will be decided by the instructor when the class is offered.Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read Less - COMPSCI 39R Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.

5 - 4 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2013 Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting.These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.Enrollment limits are set by the faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More + Rules & Requirements Hours & Format Additional Details Subject/Course Level: Computer Science/Undergraduate Grading/Final exam status: The grading option will be decided by the instructor when the class is offered.Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read Less - COMPSCI 47A Completion of Work in Computer Science 61A 1 Unit Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017 Implementation of generic operations.

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Implementation techniques for supporting functional, object-oriented, and constraint-based programming in the Scheme programming language.Together with 9D, 47A constitutes an abbreviated, self-paced version of 61A for students who have already taken a course equivalent to 61B.Completion of Work in Computer Science 61A: Read More + Rules & Requirements Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for 47A after taking 61A How to buy a custom coursework functional analysis Premium American one hour double spaced.

Completion of Work in Computer Science 61A: Read More + Rules & Requirements Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for 47A after taking 61A.

Hours & Format Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade.Instructor: Garcia COMPSCI 47B Completion of Work in Computer Science 61B 1 Unit Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017 Iterators Computer Science Berkeley Academic Guide University of nbsp.Instructor: Garcia COMPSCI 47B Completion of Work in Computer Science 61B 1 Unit Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017 Iterators.Hashing, applied to strings and multi-dimensional structures Computer Science Berkeley Academic Guide University of nbsp.

Hashing, applied to strings and multi-dimensional structures.

Design and implementation of a program containing hundreds of lines of code.Students with sufficient partial credit in 61B may, with consent of instructor, complete the credit in this self-paced course.Completion of Work in Computer Science 61B: Read More + Rules & Requirements Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for 47B after taking 61B.Hours & Format Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade.

Instructor: Garcia COMPSCI 47C Completion of Work in Computer Science 61C 1 Unit Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017 MIPS instruction set simulation.Students with sufficient partial credit in 61C may, with consent of instructor, complete the credit in this self-paced course.Completion of Work in Computer Science 61C: Read More + Rules & Requirements Prerequisites: Experience with assembly language including writing an interrupt handler, 9C or equivalent, and consent of instructor Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for 47C after taking 61C.Hours & Format Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade.Instructor: Garcia COMPSCI 61A The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs 4 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Summer 2017 8 Week Session An introduction to programming and computer science focused on abstraction techniques as means to manage program complexity.

Techniques include procedural abstraction; control abstraction using recursion, higher-order functions, generators, and streams; data abstraction using interfaces, objects, classes, and generic operators; and language abstraction using interpreters and macros.The course exposes students to programming paradigms, including functional, object-oriented, and declarative approaches.It includes an introduction to asymptotic analysis of algorithms.There are several significant programming projects.The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs: Read More + Rules & Requirements Prerequisites: Mathematics 1A (may be taken concurrently); programming experience equivalent to that gained in 3 or the Advanced Placement Computer Science A course Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Computer Science 61A after completing Computer Science 47A or Computer Science 61AS.

A deficient grade in Computer Science 61AS may be removed by taking Computer Science 61A.Hours & Format Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture, 1.5 hours of laboratory per week Summer: 8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture, 3 hours of discussion, and 3 hours of laboratory per week Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade.Instructors: Garcia, Hilfinger COMPSCI 61AS The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (Self-Paced) 1 - 4 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Summer 2015 8 Week Session Introductory programming and computer science.Abstraction as means to control program complexity.Programming paradigms: functional, object-oriented, client/server, and declarative (logic).Control abstraction: recursion and higher order functions.Introduction to asymptotic analysis of algorithms.

Data abstraction: abstract data types, type-tagged data, first class data types, sequences implemented as lists and as arrays, generic operators implemented with data-directed programming and with message passing.Implementation of object-oriented programming with closures over dispatch procedures.Introduction to interpreters and compilers.There are several significant programming projects.Course may be completed in one or two semesters.

Students must complete a mimimum of two units during their first semester of 61AS.The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (Self-Paced): Read More + Rules & Requirements Prerequisites: Mathematics 1A (may be taken concurrently).Programming experience equivalent to that gained in 10 or the Advanced Placement Computer Science A course is recommended, but is not essential; students without this experience will begin at an earlier point in the online course Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Computer Science 61AS after completing Computer Science 47A or Computer Science 61A.A deficient grade in Computer Science 61A may be removed by taking Computer Science 61AS.Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 may be repeated for a maximum of 4 units.

Hours & Format Summer: 8 weeks - 11 hours of laboratory per week Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade.Instructors: Garcia, Harvey, Hilfinger COMPSCI 61B Data Structures 4 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017 Fundamental dynamic data structures, including linear lists, queues, trees, and other linked structures; arrays strings, and hash tables.Elementary principles of software engineering.

Introduction to the Java programming language.Data Structures: Read More + Prerequisites: Computer ScienceI 61A or Computer Science 88 or Engineering 7 Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Computer Science 61B after completing Computer Science47B or 61BL.

A deficiency in Computer Science 61BL may be removed by taking Computer Science 61B.

Hours & Format Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture, 1 hour of discussion, and 2 hours of laboratory per week Summer: 8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture, 2 hours of discussion, and 4 hours of laboratory per week Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade.Instructors: Hilfinger, Shewchuk Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit.5 hours of fieldwork per week Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only.

Field Study: Read Less - Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017 Group study of selected topics in Computer Sciences, usually relating to new developments.Directed Group Studies for Advanced Undergraduates: Read More + Rules & Requirements Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit.Hours & Format Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only.Directed Group Studies for Advanced Undergraduates: Read Less - COMPSCI 199 Supervised Independent Study 1 - 4 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015 Supervised independent study.Supervised Independent Study: Read More + Rules & Requirements Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and major adviser Credit Restrictions: Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.Hours & Format Summer: 8 weeks - 1-4 hours of independent study per week Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only.Supervised Independent Study: Read Less - Electrical Engineering Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Summer 2017 8 Week Session This course and its follow-on course EE16B focus on the fundamentals of designing modern information devices and systems that interface with the real world.Together, this course sequence provides a comprehensive foundation for core EECS topics in signal processing, learning, control, and circuit design while introducing key linear-algebraic concepts motivated by application contexts.Modeling is emphasized in a way that deepens mathematical maturity, and in both labs and homework, students will engage computationally, physically, and visually with the concepts being introduced in addition to traditional paper/pencil exercises.The courses are aimed at entering students as well as non-majors seeking a broad foundation for the field.Designing Information Devices and Systems I: Read More + Rules & Requirements Prerequisites: Math 1A, Math 1B or equivalent (may be taken concurrently), CS 61A or equivalent (encouraged to be taken concurrently) Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Electrical Engineering 16A after completing Electrical Engineering 20 or 40.

Hours & Format Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture, 2 hours of discussion, and 3 hours of laboratory per week Summer: 8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture, 4 hours of discussion, and 6 hours of laboratory per week Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade.Instructors: Alon, Arcak, Ayazifar, Maharbiz, Niknejad, Ranade, Sahai, Subramanian, Tomlin Designing Information Devices and Systems I: Read Less - EL ENG 16B Designing Information Devices and Systems II 4 Units Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017 This course is a follow-on to Electrical Engineering 16A, and focuses on the fundamentals of designing and building modern information devices and systems that interface with the real world.The course sequence provides a comprehensive introduction to core EECS topics in circuit design, signals, and systems in an application-driven context.The courses are delivered assuming mathematical maturity and aptitude at roughly the level of having completed Math 1A-1B, and are aimed at entering students as well as non-majors seeking a broad introduction to the field.

Designing Information Devices and Systems II: Read More + Rules & Requirements Prerequisites: Electrical Engineering 16A, Designing Information Devices and Systems I Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Electrical Engineering 16B after completing Electrical Engineering 20 or 40.
Hours & Format Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture, 2 hours of discussion, and 3 hours of laboratory per week Additional Details Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade.Instructors: Alon, Ayazifar, Lustig, Maharbiz, Subramanian, Tomlin Designing Information Devices and Systems II: Read Less - EL ENG 24 Freshman Seminar 1 Unit Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Spring 2016 The Freshman Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting.Freshman seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics may vary from department to department and semester to semester.

Freshman Seminar: Read More + Berkeley Connect for Undergraduates Pair up, get support, and discover shared academic interests.Berkeley Connect pairs undergraduate students with graduate student More Undergraduate Research Develop your passion and skills for research! The Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program (URAP) connects undergraduates with faculty-initiated research in every field of More On the Same Page Share an intellectual experience with faculty and fellow students by listening to the cast album of Hamilton and participating in discussions, events, and courses around the 2017–2018 More DeCal Join fellow Berkeley students who create and facilitate classes not addressed in the traditional curriculum — a Berkeley tradition since More Freshman and Sophomore Seminars Discovery Courses Engage and ignite your mind! Designed for non-experts and taught by some of Berkeley’s top More