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2017-12-15 Do College Students Still Need to Buy Their Own Printer? Jul 1, 2016, 12:31 PM As a student heading off to college, you’re making a list and checking it as many times as needed to ensure that you schlep the bare minimum amount of stuff into your diminutive dorm room.Some items — like a laptop and smartphone — are non-negotiable.

(And besides, they don't take up that much space Sitemap Da m a dit.(And besides, they don't take up that much space.

) A printer, on the other hand, can command a fair chunk of dorm room real estate, so it's tempting to leave that off your packing list, especially if there are other printing options available on campus.Credit: Stokkete/ a printer a must-have item for college students or an unnecessary luxury that's better off in your rear view mirror as you depart for college? Here are a few things to consider as you contemplate whether a printer should join you on your college journey.What Does Your School Offer? Much of the decision about whether or not you take the printing plunge depends on school policy and facilities, space, your intended coursework, environmental concerns and the size of your budget."Assignments are submitted digitally, and printers take up a lot of space in small residence hall and apartment rooms.

" — Jana Lithgow, University of Illinois associate director of business career services Policies vary from school to school, but the academics we talked to said a printer isn’t the must-have item it once was for college students."Assignments are submitted digitally, and printers take up a lot of space in small residence hall and apartment rooms — and ink and paper are expensive," said Jana Lithgow, associate director of business career services at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she’s also pursuing a Ph."In fact, I just bought a printer last year, after going 10 years and completing two master's degrees without one.

" Only a small percentage of students really need printers in their rooms these days, said Michael J.Trivette, co-founder of the student counseling service College Transitions."Many colleges offer printers in various computer labs, libraries, residential halls and other locations throughout campus," Trivette told Tom’s Guide."Many times, colleges also allow students to have prepaid printing accounts tied to their student account, meaning they can easily print documents across campus by using their ID card and login information." Indeed, at the University of Illinois, Lithgow said, there are enough print kiosks and traditional computer labs to meet the printing needs of most students.

But resources can differ widely, depending on the school you choose, what you're studying, whether your school encourages you to submit your assignments electronically and how you personally work."Colleges that offer 24-hour computer labs and multiple print stations across campus offer a significant advantage over colleges that offer fewer resources," Trivette said."You can imagine how this difference might play out at a state flagship university versus your local community college, so much of this is contingent on the institution itself and the resources it provides." Some majors like history, creative writing or psychology are inherently more document-intensive than others, tilting the scales toward a printer.And even if your area of study doesn't seem like it will require a lot of paperwork, most degree programs still require students to take English and other humanities courses that will involve written assignments.

Students studying art and photography may be able to print most assignments in the lab, but perhaps you’ll want a printer around as you work into the wee hours.Your School's Attitude Toward Printing Trivette said that some colleges are becoming more eco-friendly by offering students incentives to reduce their reliance on personal printers.For example, Reed College in Portland, Oregon, gives students a printing allotment at the beginning of each year, while Warren Wilson College in Asheville, North Carolina, gives students a "print quota" at the beginning of each semester — about 400 double-sided pages.Other colleges offer a set amount of printer credits per semester.For most students, a library printer will do just fine.

"Many colleges offer printers in various computer labs, libraries, residential halls and other locations throughout campus.Trivette, College Transitions "It's also important that students and families know that different institutions will have different policies as it relates to student printing," Trivette said."For example, the School of Digital Media at the Savannah College of Art and Design requires that students bring their own paper when they want to print from the school's printers.This is due in large part to the demand for printing and the school's efforts to combat excessive waste.

"You should also think past that first year or two at college, as you move from a dorm room to off-campus housing.Depending on the location of your new digs, your access to campus printing services could change."Students who live off campus may face more of a challenge when trying to print their own documents," Trivette said."Having said that, many student residential communities also offer printers in computer labs.We suggest that students check on the resources provided by housing companies they may be reviewing when looking for off-campus housing.

"Printer Questions to ConsiderIn most cases, then, it seems you're better off leaving that printer at home."The colleges I have worked at and attended have all had print budgets that are included with tuition, so that students can print out the few things they need to at the printers in the computer labs or libraries," said Julia Cain, graduate assistant of student activities at Haverford College.That said, Cain has a printer of her own, even though she has access to the ones at her college."I do a lot of scanning and also weird things like printing on fabric or iron-on transfers, which require inkjet printing instead of laser, which is what most campus printers are," she added.If any of the following apply to you, taking a printer to school may be the right choice.

You're going to need to print out assignments rather than submit them electronically.Your school offers limited printing resources.You anticipate needing to print documents at hours when school facilities might be closed.So what criteria should you look at when considering a dorm room printer? Besides obvious factors like the printer's size — you'll want something that doesn't take up too much space — and the operating system your computer is running (Mac, Windows or Linux), here's what to consider.Canon's Pixma MG3620 is a low-cost inkjet printer that produces sharp-looking vs.

Inkjet: Laser printers use a toner cartridge, while inkjet printers rely on ink cartridges.If your coursework involves an astronomical amount of text-only assignments, consider a laser printer: they’re fast and the ink lasts and lasts.If your courses involve a lower volume of printed material — or perhaps you are able to hand in most of your assignments electronically — an inkjet printer will suit your needs nicely.Newer models are fairly speedy and print very well.

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Monochrome: If your class assignments mostly involve printing text, there’s no reason to purchase a color printer.A black-and-white printer, whether inkjet or laser, will get the job done.However, if you will routinely be printing graphics, presentations or photos for your studies, then a color printer is more appropriate https://damadit.org/thesis.php 2017-12-15 daily 0.9 https://damadit.org/paper.php 2017-12-15 daily 0.9 https://damadit.org/homework.php 2017-12-15 daily 0.9   2017-12-15 daily 0.9 https://damadit.org/paper/best-websites-to-buy-an-internet-paper-business-48-hours-double-spaced-no-plagiarism 2017-12-15 daily 0.9  .However, if you will routinely be printing graphics, presentations or photos for your studies, then a color printer is more appropriate.

(Note that color printers have separate black- and colored-ink cartridges that you may find yourself replacing at a rapid clip: Each one costs somewhat more than a latte, though typically they come in packs of four.) Because color laser prints tend to be more expensive than their inkjet counterparts, it's better to stick with inkjets if you need color.

Multifunction Printers: While it may seem like you'd just need a printer to output reports, you'd be smart to consider a device that also scans and copies documents and images Manuscripts must be double-spaced, no more than 1,200 words. November 29 Lucent Technologies Foundation Room 3C209 600 Mountain Avenue Murray Hill, NJ 07974 Engineering, Science, Mathematics or related field Full tuition, university fees, books, an annual living stipend of $17,000 travel expenses and a Bell  .Multifunction Printers: While it may seem like you'd just need a printer to output reports, you'd be smart to consider a device that also scans and copies documents and images.All-in-one printers add those features without adding too much size or cost, and scanning and copying are sure to come in handy in ways you can't anticipate.The HP Envy 5540 is the Tom's Guide pick for best overall printer — and it costs less than $ -Fi or USB: If your dorm has a wireless network, getting a device that prints wirelessly would seem like a no-brainer.But first, check on your school's policy about wireless printers, as some schools restrict their use due to privacy concerns.

Many Wi-Fi-capable printers also come with a USB cable for hooking up to your computer.

Be sure to buy a printer that packs a printer cable in the box, which saves you the hassle of having to add one later.Cost: The good news: you can find a very capable printer for around $150 — and even less in some cases.And the bad news? Your costs don't end once you buy a printer, since you'll also need to consider the cost of replacement ink.When Tom's Guide reviews printers, we take cost per page into account.To get a sense of how much a printer will cost you over time, simply look at the cost of replacement cartridges and divide that by the printer's promised output.

The Best Printer for College Our choice for best budget inkjet printer — Canon's Pixma MG3620 — offers a lot for college students.Besides its $60 price tag, the Pixma MG3620 offers a fairly compact 17.Your papers will look sharp, and you can print documents wirelessly.The Pixma MG3620's cost per page is a little steep — 10.

6 cents for black-and-white documents and 24 cents for color — but you can reduce those costs a little by opting for high-yield ink cartridges.Canon Pixma MG3620 You can also get our top-rated printer, the HP Envy 5540, for less than $100.1 inches, this inkjet is a tad bulkier than the Pixma MG3620, but it delivers great performance and high-quality prints, particularly if you expect to print a lot of images.Its toner costs are also reasonable, and you can lower those even further by opting for HP's ink subscription plan.HP Envy 5540 MW 11:35am-12:50pm Close reading of novels, memoirs, and journalism from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to understand how certain novelists have set about to rework fiction and nonfiction source materials to create new narrative. The significance of such artistic means as shifting the setting, altering or questioning gender identity or sexual orientation of characters, or shifting the historical moment or political framework of the action.Exploration of how new works dispose the reader to reinterpret earlier works, providing a basis for redefining what constitutes originality in writing fiction.

Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.— MW 9:00am-10:15am Is there really a separation of Church and State in America? Is religion a private matter? Has modernity marginalized religion? In this course, we will examine the role of religion in the public sphere, and we will challenge our understanding of what it means to be religious in a secular world.According to Charles Taylor, we in the West have come to a point where belief in God is no longer unchallenged and the presumption of unbelief is dominant, especially in intellectual milieus.In spite of the decline in religious belief, however, contemporary debates on marriage and sexuality, gender, and race hinge on notions of religious morality.

What might these conversations reveal about the boundary between religion and politics? Is a secular outlook the solution to the challenges of religious diversity in America? We will read essays on these debates in disciplines as varied as law, biology, theology, philosophy, anthropology, and race and gender studies.As we explore the relationship between religion and secularity, we will also be concerned with how religion affects the more intimate aspects of our lives.How does religion constitute our identity and define our relationship to others? How does belief or unbelief influence our sense of purpose and fulfillment? We will examine the tensions, conflicts, and anxieties religion inspires in our public and private lives.— MW 1:00pm-2:15pm Is there really a separation of Church and State in America? Is religion a private matter? Has modernity marginalized religion? In this course, we will examine the role of religion in the public sphere, and we will challenge our understanding of what it means to be religious in a secular world.According to Charles Taylor, we in the West have come to a point where belief in God is no longer unchallenged and the presumption of unbelief is dominant, especially in intellectual milieus.

In spite of the decline in religious belief, however, contemporary debates on marriage and sexuality, gender, and race hinge on notions of religious morality.What might these conversations reveal about the boundary between religion and politics? Is a secular outlook the solution to the challenges of religious diversity in America? We will read essays on these debates in disciplines as varied as law, biology, theology, philosophy, anthropology, and race and gender studies.As we explore the relationship between religion and secularity, we will also be concerned with how religion affects the more intimate aspects of our lives.How does religion constitute our identity and define our relationship to others? How does belief or unbelief influence our sense of purpose and fulfillment? We will examine the tensions, conflicts, and anxieties religion inspires in our public and private lives.— TTh 9:00am-10:15am Every day, at every hour, we are bombarded by hundreds of news items via traditional broadcast and print outlets, social media sites, blogs, wikis, podcasts, and more.

Confronted with so much information, we must decide what news to consume and which source(s) to trust.The stakes are high: what is available to us and on what platforms affect our choices to take (or not take) action, engage in civil protest, vote in key elections , conserve resources, and more.The rapid and radical changes we witness in our news and information environment make public and private decisions even more difficult, particularly in a global context.In a democratic society, the media are expected to create an informed citizenry able to debate issues in the public sphere.But are they doing their job? How might the news manufacture our consent—that is, to what extent do media shape our opinions rather than create the conditions for democracy? The central questions of this course include: What role do the media play in US democracy? How has news production and consumption changed, with the rise of citizen journalists? Because most of our news now comes to us in digital form, we must ask ourselves, how do digital forms of news production and consumption affect American democracy? — TTh 11:35am-12:50pm How do we make sense of social divisions? Why do those divisions seem to have intensified in recent years? And what is to be done about them? This course seeks to shed light on the persistent problem of inequality by querying what we mean when we say equality today.

Perhaps most provocatively, we will spend a good deal of time making heretical if corollary inquiries: What if the trouble lies with the notion of equality itself? To do so we will tarry with a few historical touchstones such as Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s Discourse on the Origin of Inequality and the Declaration of Independence.From there we will take up the trouble with equality today in terms of race, gender, sexuality, and class before bringing what we glean to bear upon how the Black Lives Matter movement responds to mass incarceration and the legacy of slavery.We will conclude by examining the rise of the Alt-Right and no-platform campaigns that have reignited debates over free speech on campus here at Yale and elsewhere.

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— TTh 4:00pm-5:15pm How do we make sense of social divisions? Why do those divisions seem to have intensified in recent years? And what is to be done about them? This course seeks to shed light on the persistent problem of inequality by querying what we mean when we sayequality today.Perhaps most provocatively, we will spend a good deal of time making heretical if corollary inquiries: What if the trouble lies with the notion of equality itself? To do so we will tarry with a few historical touchstones such as Jean-Jacques Rousseau’sDiscourse on the Origin of Inequality and theDeclaration of Independence.

From there we will take up the trouble with equality today in terms of race, gender, sexuality, and class before bringing what we glean to bear upon how the Black Lives Matter movement responds to mass incarceration and the legacy of slavery .From there we will take up the trouble with equality today in terms of race, gender, sexuality, and class before bringing what we glean to bear upon how the Black Lives Matter movement responds to mass incarceration and the legacy of slavery.

We will conclude by examining the rise of the Alt-Right and no-platform campaigns that have reignited debates over free speech on campus here at Yale and elsewhere.— TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm Do we really need empathy? Is “putting yourself in another’s shoes” the remedy to the political, racial, and economic divisions that fill our headlines and newsfeeds? In 2006, then senator Barack Obama suggested as much when he argued that a “sense of empathy” needs to “infuse our politics College Admissions Data Sourcebook Northeast Edition Bound 2010 11.— TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm Do we really need empathy? Is “putting yourself in another’s shoes” the remedy to the political, racial, and economic divisions that fill our headlines and newsfeeds? In 2006, then senator Barack Obama suggested as much when he argued that a “sense of empathy” needs to “infuse our politics.” But is there a limit to what empathy can do? Is putting yourself in another’s place even possible? If it is, whom should we feel empathy for? We will start with Adam Smith’s influential work on empathy, asking what are empathy’s necessary conditions, along with Achille Mbembe’s work on enmity and society College Admissions Data Sourcebook Northeast Edition Bound 2010 11.

” But is there a limit to what empathy can do? Is putting yourself in another’s place even possible? If it is, whom should we feel empathy for? We will start with Adam Smith’s influential work on empathy, asking what are empathy’s necessary conditions, along with Achille Mbembe’s work on enmity and society.

Then we will move to cognitive science and studies on empathy produced in readers of literary fiction; we will test those claims by reading Recitatif by Toni Morrison.

We will examine “empathy-projects”: contemporary works that mobilize a radical engagement with empathy to transform a reader’s position on such issues as trans rights, class politics in the 21st century, neo-liberalism and the commodification of emotion, and the clash between religion and medicine should i buy human resources management (hrm) homework US Letter Size 11 days single spaced.We will examine “empathy-projects”: contemporary works that mobilize a radical engagement with empathy to transform a reader’s position on such issues as trans rights, class politics in the 21st century, neo-liberalism and the commodification of emotion, and the clash between religion and medicine.We will conclude by asking if humans are the only fit subject for empathy.What about animals, the environment, and even machines? We will ask: what does it take for empathy to transform the subject and what are the limits of that transformation? As Anne Fadiman writes, “empathy is so hard – harder than anger, harder than pity.” — MW 4:00pm-5:15pm Today, most of us would accept the claim that art is political.TV shows, movies, music – we assume that such cultural objects can express ideals, make arguments, represent characters in politically significant ways, and even teach us how the world works.

But where do our intuitions come from? Do they stand up to scrutiny? Drawing on perspectives from philosophy, political theory, the history of media, black studies, and gender studies, this class explores the uneasy place that artworks occupy on the terrain of the political.To begin, we will consider the status of art in the modern world.How do the economic and technological transformations of modernity change our sense of art’s capabilities? In response to this question, we raise the thorny issue of mass culture and its relation to high art and artistic subcultures.Can art today ever be more than a commodity? What does it mean to create in opposition to the mainstream? We then delve into the ongoing debate about the politics of vision, representation, and the gaze in film and other visual media.We will consider in detail the limits of what art can or should show us, without giving up on the idea that art reveals the world in new and life-altering ways.

— TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm What distinguishes the period we call childhood from other stages of life?How have works of literature shaped our understanding of what children are like?What does the experience of reading books offer to children themselves?Might books offer children windows into a wider world, reveal that there are other people like themselves, introduce them to lives different from their own, and/or inculcate ideas that restrict or close down their views?This seminar will explore these questions by considering select works of literature both for children and about them.We will read several classic works of children’s literature, including J.White’s Charlotte’s Web, as well as more recent favorites such as J.Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban.We will investigate the intertwined histories of modern conceptions of childhood and of the children’s book trade, reading poems about childhood by Wordsworth and Blake and visiting the Beinecke to view early works of children’s literature.We will also sample memoirs of childhood, such as Richard Wright’s Black Boy and Pauli Murray’s Proud Shoes.

Throughout, we will attend to how the meaning of childhood is shaped by categories of race, gender, and socioeconomic class.We will meet on one or more occasions with children from New Haven Public Schools to learn more about their creative responses to what they read.— MW 1:00pm-2:15pm According to the writers at Wired, ours is a snack culture in which cultural commodities are made for quick consumption and disposal, “to be munched easily with increased frequency and maximum speed.” How, then, do phenomenally strange and often unpalatable works elicit fierce, long-term loyalty? We will begin by articulating some reasons for cult fiction’s peculiar appeal; develop theories for why we might seek risk or difficulty in art when there is enough risk and difficulty in life; and consider the otaku, the strange case of a niche culture gone global.Throughout, we’ll ask what cult classics can tell us more generally about modernism, which is also known for compressing elements previously thought to be incommensurable.

— TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm Throughout English literary history, the Bible has played a major role in the formation of literature.From medieval plays to contemporary poetry, the Bible’s is a rich trove of tropes, allusions, and character schemas.The literature uses these tropes to ask variations on a not so simple question: Where does God fit in the chaos of the world? For example, John Milton’s Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained would be a literary treatise on God’s plan for human history and has become a reference point for the literature to follow.Among these texts that would follow is African American literature, which asks this same question with different stakes at play.This class will look at how African-American literature engages with the Bible to think about history, freedom, hope, suffering, and death.

For example, the Exodus is a prominent symbol of escape, hope, and movement found across generations of writers.In addition, the life and figure of Christ becomes a metaphor of undeserved suffering and the possibility of (or foreclosure on) the possibility of redemption.As we will we read, stories like The Fall, Abraham ad Isaac, and the Crucifixion are reshaped and reinterpreted in poems, short stories, and novels, we’ll seek to understand.What does a religious text have to say to an increasingly secular world? In what ways has the Bible shaped formations of race? Why is the Bible such an important text to canonical African-American writers, such as Phillis Wheatley, James Weldon Johnson, and Zora Neale Hurston, among others? Can literature play a role in creating a more inclusive theology? — TTh 9:00am-10:15am In the last two hundred years, our planet has changed at an unprecedented rate: humans have extinguished other species, toxic chemicals have poisoned ecosystems, and greenhouse gases have altered our very atmosphere.In this course, we will study Anglo American, African American, Native American, Latina/o, and British authors who have engaged with these transformations.

On the one hand, we will ask a range of literary questions: How have novels, essays, poems, and other forms depicted the more-than-human world? How have images, symbols, settings, and other devices created a sense of place? On the other hand, we will pursue a series of historical inquiries: How have literary texts reproduced the ideologies that allow us to (ab)use our environments? Conversely, how have literary texts critiqued destructive policies, illuminated ecological crises, and inspired environmental movements? Throughout, we will pay particularly close attention to the relationships between social conflict and ecological change, and indeed, the indivisibility of these processes; how, we will ask, have gender, race, and class shaped the ways we write and think about environments? Authors may include Harriet Jacobs, Henry David Thoreau, Jos Mart , John Muir, Zitk la- , Willa Cather, Langston Hughes, Ann Petry, Aldo Leopold, Rachel Carson, Piri Thomas, Leslie Marmon Silko, Helena Mar a Viramontes, and Indra Sinha, supplemented by readings in eco-criticism and the environmental humanities.— MW 2:30pm-3:45pm By what authority can a government declare something to be true?And by what power can citizens resist that imposition?This course will look at how literary works throughout history have dealt with the real or threatened imposition of authoritarian power – how literature provides a means and a mechanism for resistance against the oppression of the state in ways that harness unexpectedly rigorous and logical scientific thinking.We will read selections of John Milton’s Paradise Lost (1667), and Margaret Cavendish’s The Blazing World (1666), paired with theoretical texts by political philosopher Thomas Hobbes, and scientist Robert Hooke.We will also examine dystopian science fiction such as George Orwell’s 1984 (1949) and Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale (1985).We will use these works to think together about how literature both fails and succeeds as a concrete form of protest, and how this strangely entwined impotence and efficacy functions at the level of language.

Together we will explore how language can both ameliorate and sew discord, depending on how it is used.And, centrally, we will ask whether and how that discord can ever be resolved into something like universal truth, and if so, who has the power to determine it.— MW 1:00pm-2:15pm Medical and public health stories shape the way individuals view health and disease, and coverage sometime influences scientific research or health policy.This course will give students the chance to join this conversation by writing about medicine and public health for general audiences.To do this well, students must develop a keen sense of audience as they translate complicated science, explain its ramifications, and provide historical context.

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Students will write breaking news stories, blog posts, a researched feature article, and a personal essay.They may also have the chance to interview a patient from Yale-New Haven Hospital.In class, we will analyze essays, book chapters, and news stories for craft The Longman Reader, 12th ed. New York: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2012. Print. • Loose-leaf paper and writing instruments for in-class writing activities • Electronic devices when announced or needed. Technology Accounts Used Activation of GSU (or preferred) E-mail Account Turnitin.com Moodle Online Writing Centers—free  .In class, we will analyze essays, book chapters, and news stories for craft.

Students will also explore visual media to hone observational skills, and we’ll visit the Center for British Art for a workshop on observation developed for Yale medical students.

Prerequisites: ENGL 114, 115, 120, or another writing-intensive course at Yale.

— TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm Religion touches everything—politics, history, literature, art; friendship, family, food, pop culture; ritual, belief, belonging, community; race, gender, sexuality, and souls Individual scholarship/grant packages range from $100 to $20,000 (undergraduates); $100 to $17,000 (freshmen).   Education/4-8, Education/8-12, Education/Early Childhood-4, Engineering Science, English, English Teaching, Environmental Science, Exercise Science, Family Studies, Financial Management, Graphic  .— TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm Religion touches everything—politics, history, literature, art; friendship, family, food, pop culture; ritual, belief, belonging, community; race, gender, sexuality, and souls.It makes sense that writing about religion is incredibly capacious, creative, and diverse.In this class we will read and write about religion in a variety of genres, including personal and academic essays; journalistic genres, including reported and opinion pieces; and literary and devotional work, such as poems, short stories, and prayers best websites to get a ww1 thesis Academic Writing Undergrad.In this class we will read and write about religion in a variety of genres, including personal and academic essays; journalistic genres, including reported and opinion pieces; and literary and devotional work, such as poems, short stories, and prayers.We will spend time with religious art and artifacts in the archive and at the museum, and explore a variety of sacred spaces on and off campus.In the process, students will strengthen their research and writing skills, and use these skills to pursue their own religious interests and questions.

Prerequisites: ENGL 114, 115, 120, or another writing-intensive course at Yale.— MW 2:30pm-3:45pm If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound? If history happens and no one writes about it, what have we missed? If a historian writes about history and no one wants to read it, how could that historian have done a better job? In writing about history, you place yourself between the history and your audience.Without you, the connection is not made.But history, historian, and audience are always changing: we uncover new sources and ask new questions of old sources; the grand old men of historical scholarship are now history themselves; diverse readerships look to history for information, for inspiration, for entertainment, for identity.In this class we will talk, read, and write about who we are when we write history and about how we can write a history – from biography to obituary, from museum guide to encyclopedia entry – that is both engaging and honest.

Prerequisites: ENGL 114, 115, 120, or another writing-intensive course at Yale.— TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm It has been said that writing about music is like dancing about architecture – and indeed, evoking melody, harmony, and rhythm with words can challenge even the most observant and eloquent among us.In this section of English 121, students will read and discuss writing on music by not only scholars and critics (e.Margo Jefferson and Kalefa Sanneh) but also journalists (Joan Didion and Susan Orlean), a poet (LeRoi Jones), anovelist (Jonathan Lethem), and many others.

The focus will be on popular music, very broadly defined, and among the concepts to be investigated are taste and “cool.” Written assignments will include a critical review of a performance or recording, a literary essay on a musical topic, a profile of a musician, and an academic paper. The goal of the course is for students to improve their skills at observation, description, and analysis of culture.Prerequisites: ENGL 114, 115, 120, or another writing-intensive course at Yale.— TTh 11:35am-12:50pm An examination of how exemplary critics, such as David Foster Wallace, Joan Didion, Eula Biss, Kelefa Sanneh, Ariel Levy, Ian Frazer, Kyoko Mori, Adam Gopnik, Henry Louis Gates, Louis Menand, Ted Conover, Amitava Kumar, Wesley Yang, Malcolm Gladwell, Roxane Gay, Eric Schlosser, and Elizabeth Kolbert, and others, use elements of style—diction, tone, narrative structure—as both a mode of investigation and a means of persuasion.

Our close attention to how these writers use style as argument will help students develop crucial rhetorical skills especially in light of recent social scientific studies that have affirmed that when it comes to persuading readers on cultural issues, the emotional and experiential are at least as important as the rational or factual.Units will be organized around readings that highlight a particular stylistic approach—critique via personal narrative, artful analyses of cultural framing (society’s narrative instinct), and more in-depth critiques that interweave personal narrative or perspective with research and analysis.Students will close read model essays for craft, research cultural objects that interest them, and craft their own cultural critiques designed to question and persuade not merely with style but by way of style.Prerequisites: ENGL 114, 115, 120, or another writing-intensive course at Yale.— T 1:30pm-3:20pm An intensive introduction to the craft of fiction, designed for aspiring creative writers.

Focus on the fundamentals of narrative technique and peer review.Spring application due by noon on December 6.After completing the onlineAPPLICATION FORM, upload one Word or Adobe PDF document that contains your name, the course number (e., ENGL 245), instructor’s name, a statement of purpose, a writing sample of approximately 5-10 pages or up to 4500 words of poetry, double-spaced.

For the statement of purpose, please write a paragraph about why you wish to take this specific writing course.The file should be named with the course number and your name (Sample: ENGL 245 ).— Welcome to English 245! In this class you will write fiction; receive and give out constructive criticism; and read and analyze outstanding published works of fiction.Below are the requirements for this course, as well as general guidelines to assure a productive workshop for us all.ATTENDANCE Your regular attendance is crucial for the success of the workshop as a whole.

In this course you’re equally an author and a critic, and fulfilling your critical responsibilities to your fellow writers is as important here as producing your own work.If you have more than one unexcused absence, each additional unexcused absence will lower your grade 1/3 of a letter.Choose for your submissions the work on which you most want feedback.Submission length:There is no set length for workshop submissions, but consider the ballpark as between 5 and 15 pages.

Format:Double-space, number your pages, and include your name.If you can, please print double-sided as well, to avoid waste.Distribution:Writers must bring to class hard copies of their submissions one week in advance of their workshop, to be distributed to classmates and to me.FEEDBACK As a member of the workshop, I’ll expect your regular participation in classroom discussions of the writing ‘up’ for workshop any given week.In addition, I expect you to treat each workshop submission in the following way: 1)read each submission first for pleasure; put your feet up, and don’t hold a pen.

2)a bit later, read the submission again, as a critic.

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This time, hold a pen, and make what marginal comments occur to you on the page.3)last, summarize your critical response to the submission in a typed paragraph.When doing this, think of the sort of feedback you, as a writer, would appreciate Where to get a environmental technology paper Chicago double spaced A4 (British/European) 74 pages / 20350 words.

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Print and bring to workshop two copies of your critical response, one for the author of the piece, and one for me.READING, AND WRITING EXERCISES Every week for the first 6 weeks of class there will be assigned reading of published works, and assigned writing exercises, which I’ll announce and explain during class.Assigned readings may include works by such writers as Julia Alvarez, Jennifer Egan, Vladimir Nabokov, and Michael Cunningham 64 Billion Scholarship Boon 10 Ways to Get Your Share.Assigned readings may include works by such writers as Julia Alvarez, Jennifer Egan, Vladimir Nabokov, and Michael Cunningham.Exercises will focus on specific aspects of craft such as point of view, characterization, dialogue, setting, and plot.You will be responsible for these assignments regardless of whether you might also be ‘up’ for workshop on the due date of a given assignment.

You are welcome to submit a writing assignment piece as your workshop piece. If you miss class, it is your responsibility to contact either me or a classmate to find out the assignment.PUBLIC READINGS Every year, the Yale Creative Writing Program brings outstanding writers to campus.You are not required, but you are strongly encouraged to take advantage of this resource.FINAL REVISION A substantial revision of one of your two workshop pieces will be due to my box in the English Department on a date to be announced during Reading Period.

GRADING Your final grade will be based upon your attendance, participation in discussions, critical responses to your peers, and timely completion of all reading and writing assignments.Creative Writing M 3:30pm-5:20pm A seminar workshop for students who are beginning to write poetry or who have no prior workshop experience at Yale.Spring application due by noon on December 6.After completing the onlineAPPLICATION FORM, upload one Word or Adobe PDF document that contains your name, the course number (e., ENGL 245), instructor’s name, a statement of purpose, a writing sample of approximately 5-10 pages or up to 4500 words of poetry, double-spaced.For the statement of purpose, please write a paragraph about why you wish to take this specific writing course.The file should be named with the course number and your name (Sample: ENGL 245 ).Creative Writing TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm This course focuses on crafting television drama with a strong emphasis on creating and developing an original concept from premise to pilot.Much has been written about the current “golden age” of dramatic television; the course takes as one of its precepts that the finest television dramas being created today aspire to literary quality.

Our aim this term is to demystify the process of creating and writing serious television drama, for students of all levels, from beginners to more experienced writers of drama and fiction.We will approach the writing of television drama like any other form of fiction writing, as a craft.To that end, we will closely read original scripts of critically-acclaimed series from a diverse range of creators.By the end of the course, students will be responsible for creating a series “bible” which will include formal story and world descriptions, orchestrated character biographies, a detailed pilot outline, and two or more acts of an original series pilot.No application required prior to the first class.

Creative Writing MW 11:35am-12:50pm To present a piece of writing for the express purpose of making your audience laugh takes a peculiar combination of courage and confidence.After all, you aren’t simply seeking to avoid the audience’s displeasure; a humorous work must create pleasure, or else it has failed.The notion thatyou can give a large number of people the pleasure of laughter when most others cannot takes an abnormally high level of confidence in your ability to perceive, create, and express (or an extreme lack of self-awareness).This class is for students who have the guts and conviction that they can make others laugh, or for those seeking to acquire such confidence by discovering and understanding the comic techniques employed by great humorists.This course will emphasize four broad elements of humorous writing: texture, tone, character, and narrative.

We will focus less formally on the various genres of humor writing (parody, satire, farce, &c.Humor writing demands an exceptionally high level of linguistic grace and precision, as a slight difference in expression can mean the difference between a laugh and a groan.A strong emphasis will be placed on crafting sentences elegantly and expressing meanings with exactitude, skills essential not just to writing humorously, but to all genres of writing.

Prerequisites: ENGL 120 recommended, but not required.No application required prior to the first class.Creative Writing MW 2:30pm-3:45pm For much of the nineteenth century Ireland was widely regarded as a literary periphery of England, but during the last decade of the nineteenth century and in the first several decades of the twentieth century a series of intersecting cultural movements sought to change this situation by furnishing modern Ireland with its own national literature and by making Dublin a cultural capital in its own right.These movements stimulated an extraordinary literary ferment, generally termed the Irish Literary Revival, during which time Ireland produced some of the most notable Anglophone writers of the twentieth century.However, the aesthetic and cultural ambitions of those involved varied widely and now, a century later, the achievements of the Revivalist period remain controversial.

Some scholars contend that the Revival produced an essentially neo-romantic literary vision of Ireland while for others it stimulated one of the finest bursts of twentieth-century postcolonial and modernist creativity.Authors discussed may include Matthew Arnold, Oscar Wilde, W.Synge, James Joyce, Sean O’Casey, Elizabeth Bowen, and Samuel Beckett.Course Work: Writing for this course involves completing two essays (7-10 midterm; 12-15 pages final).Students will also be asked to submit questions in advance of some seminars and may be required to do short presentations or other class assignments.Th 2:30-5:20 A seminar and workshop in first-person writing.

Students explore a series of themes (including food, family, love, and identity) both by writing about their own lives and by reading British and American memoirs, autobiographies, personal essays, and letters.An older work, usually from the nineteenth or early twentieth century, is paired each week with a more recent one on the same theme.

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Spring application due by noon on December 6.— Please read the course description below, paying special attention to sections highlighted in bold, some of which describe exceptions to the standard application procedure.This is a reading and writing class—part lecture, part seminar, part workshop—in which students explore a series of themes (including love, loss, family, and identity) both by writing about their own lives and by reading British and American memoirs, autobiographies, letters, and personal essays Individual scholarship/grant packages range up to $19,731 (undergraduates); $218 to $18,231 (freshmen).   Degree Offerings Associate: A.A., A.Eng.Tech., A.S. Baccalaureate: B.A., B.F.A., B.S., B.S.Art Ed., B.S.Ed., B.S.N. Master's: M.A., M.Ed., M.F.A., M.S., M.S.N., M.S.W. Majors Leading to Bachelor's Degree Actuarial  .

This is a reading and writing class—part lecture, part seminar, part workshop—in which students explore a series of themes (including love, loss, family, and identity) both by writing about their own lives and by reading British and American memoirs, autobiographies, letters, and personal essays.

First-person writing is a peculiar blend of candor, catharsis, narcissism, and indiscretion.The purpose of this class is to harness these elements with sufficient rigor and imagination that self-portraiture becomes interesting to others as well as to oneself G Funny how the student who is quiet as a mouse makes the most noise With today's technology, students have a new voice to shout their thoughts.   years High school seniors and college freshmen at accredited four-year college; must be sponsored by NAPHCC member in good standing for two years prior to application;  .The purpose of this class is to harness these elements with sufficient rigor and imagination that self-portraiture becomes interesting to others as well as to oneself.Each week, we will read two works on a particular theme, one “old” (ranging from four decades to more than two centuries ago) and one “new” (mostly from the last two decades) —a coupling designed to erode the traditional academic boundaries between eras and between “ought” and “want” reading G Funny how the student who is quiet as a mouse makes the most noise With today's technology, students have a new voice to shout their thoughts.   years High school seniors and college freshmen at accredited four-year college; must be sponsored by NAPHCC member in good standing for two years prior to application;  .Each week, we will read two works on a particular theme, one “old” (ranging from four decades to more than two centuries ago) and one “new” (mostly from the last two decades) —a coupling designed to erode the traditional academic boundaries between eras and between “ought” and “want” reading.(For instance, when we consider the theme of love, we will read excerpts from H.Wells’s On Loves and the Lover-Shadow and Joyce Maynard’s At Home in the World, and write personal essays on an aspect of love, not necessarily romantic.) Readings will include works by James Baldwin, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Joan Didion, Lucy Grealy, Maxine Hong Kingston, Mary McCarthy, James Thurber, and Virginia Woolf, among others.Our connections to the readings will be reinforced by several author visits.By writing a thousand-word first-person essay every other week, students will face the same problems the authors in our syllabus have faced, though they may come up with very different solutions.Students will critique each other’s work in class and by e-mail.

Each student will have at least five individual conferences with me, most of them an hour long, in which we’ll edit your work together.Students who wish to apply to “Writing about Oneself” should submit the standard Application for Creative Writing and Journalism Courses1.The standard application specifies “a” writing sample.Ignore that! I can assess your work better if you submit two samples, totaling 5-15 pages if double-spaced work or around half that if single-spaced.(If the total length exceeds that, please mark the sections to which I should pay particular attention.

) You may even submit three samples if one is very short (for instance, a Daily Themes one-pager, in which case please note the prompt).If possible, your samples should belong to the same genre we’ll be reading and writing (“non-non”–nonacademic nonfiction).Personal essays, other nonacademic essays, and literary journalism would all be appropriate.In other words, writing about yourself would be welcome but not required.

(If fiction is your strength, one but not both of your samples may be a short story.Similarly, if you’re a playwright, one sample may be a scene from a play.) Choose pieces that give your literary style a thorough airing.Cogency will be valued; interminable tomes will cause me to droop.

Your “statement of purpose”—essentially, a letter to me—should explain some things your samples won’t tell me.The application suggests “a paragraph,” but you are welcome to write as long a letter as you wish.For instance: Why do you want to take the class? What would you contribute to it? What writing experience and honors have you accumulated? (I’ll still consider you if the answer is None and None.) What are you majoring in? (English majors receive no special preference.

) Is there anything else that might help me understand you as a writer or a person? Your letter need not be conventional; it should sound like you.I am not looking for a particular kind of writer.My ideal class is a mix of experienced journalists and creative writers (usually fiction writers or playwrights), with a couple of students who fit no category but just happen to write beautifully.Although most of its members will likely be juniors and seniors, anyone may apply.Creative Writing TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm This course combines a seminar on the history and theory of translation (Tuesdays) with a hands-on workshop (Thursdays).The readings will lead us through a series of case studies comparing, on the one hand, multiple translations of given literary works and, on the other, classic statements about translation—by translators themselves and prominent theorists.We’ll consider both poetry and prose from the Bible, selections from Chinese, Greek, and Latin verse, classical Arabic and Persian literature, prose by Cervantes, Borges, and others, and modern European poetry (including Pushkin, Baudelaire, and Rilke).Students will be expected to prepare short class presentations, participate in a weekly workshop, try their hand at a series of translation exercises, and undertake an intensive, semester-long translation project.Proficiency in a foreign language is required.

May be taken for graduate credit by permission of the student’s department.No application required prior to the first class.Also HUMS 427, JDST 316, LITR 348, CPLT 925.20pm A writing workshop that addresses aspects of the craft of fiction that the genres of romance share with all fiction, including tactics and strategy of narrative, point of view and voice, and reader expectations.Spring application due by noon on December 6.After completing the onlineAPPLICATION FORM, upload one Word or Adobe PDF document that contains your name, the course number (e., ENGL 245), instructor’s name, a statement of purpose, a writing sample of approximately 5-10 pages or up to 4500 words of poetry, double-spaced.

For the statement of purpose, please write a paragraph about why you wish to take this specific writing course.The file should be named with the course number and your name (Sample: ENGL 245 ).Creative Writing T 3:30pm-5:20pm An advanced workshop in the craft of writing fiction.

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May be repeated for credit with a different instructor.Spring application due by noon on December 6.

After completing the onlineAPPLICATION FORM, upload one Word or Adobe PDF document that contains your name, the course number (e College Admissions Data Sourcebook Northeast Edition Looseleaf 2010 11.After completing the onlineAPPLICATION FORM, upload one Word or Adobe PDF document that contains your name, the course number (e.

, ENGL 245), instructor’s name, a statement of purpose, a writing sample of approximately 5-10 pages or up to 4500 words of poetry, double-spaced.For the statement of purpose, please write a paragraph about why you wish to take this specific writing course Where to buy a college environmental technology paper British A4 (British/European) Vancouver 34 pages / 9350 words.For the statement of purpose, please write a paragraph about why you wish to take this specific writing course.The file should be named with the course number and your name (Sample: ENGL 245 ).

Special application instructions: In your Statement of Purpose, please describe your interest in fiction-writing and in this course in particular.— Welcome to English 465! This class is an intensive fiction workshop.While there are no official prerequisites for this class, participants are expected to be avid readers of fiction with prior experience in the writing of fiction and basic familiarity with the workshop format.Each student will submit three pieces for workshop, the third being a revision of one of the first two.Students will also provide each other with written editorial feedback, and will maintain a daily ‘notebook.

’ Below are these requirements and general guidelines in greater detail.ATTENDANCE Your regular attendance is crucial for the success of the workshop as a whole.In this course you’re equally an author and a critic, and fulfilling your critical responsibilities to your fellow writers is as important here as producing your own work.If you have more than one unexcused absence, each additional unexcused absence will lower your grade 1/3 of a letter.Your third submission must be a revision of either of the first two submissions.We’ll divide the semester into three ‘cycles’ (Round One, Round Two, Revision) and I’ll ask you to sign up for a workshop date within each of the three cycles.Once you commit to your workshop dates, you will be expected to stick with them if at all possible.If it is absolutely necessary for you to reschedule, please discuss with me first.Submission length:There is no set length for workshop submissions, but consider the ballpark as between 5 and 15 pages.

Format:Double-space, number your pages, and include your name.If you can, please print double-sided as well, to avoid waste.Distribution:Writers must bring to class hard copies of their submissions one week in advance of their workshop, to be distributed to classmates and to me.*Exceptions will be made for our first workshop and our post-recess workshop.In those cases, writers will distribute their work to the class via email on a date to be determined and readers are responsible for printing out the stories under discussion.

All discussion of work in class will be from hard copies.FEEDBACK As a member of the workshop, I’ll expect your regular participation in classroom discussions of the writing ‘up’ for workshop any given week.In addition, I expect you to treat each workshop submission in the following way: 1)read each submission first for pleasure; put your feet up, and don’t hold a pen.2)a bit later, read the submission again, as a critic.This time, hold a pen, and make what marginal comments occur to you on the page.

3)last, summarize your critical response to the submission in a typed paragraph.When doing this, think of the sort of feedback you, as a writer, would appreciate.Print and bring to workshop two copies of your critical response, one for the author of the piece, and one for me.

DAILY ‘NOTEBOOK’ Given the volume of reading and writing the workshop alone will require, I will not assign additional reading, or specific exercises.I will, however, ask you to make a commitment to that part of your attention dedicated to fiction-writing by keeping a ‘notebook’ in which you make a daily ‘entry’ of about 100 words.100 words happens to be the exact length of the three numbered instructions, taken together, which appear immediately above this paragraph.As you can see, it’s not a lot of words.

This entry can be anything at all: an idea for a story;a quick sketch of a character or a setting; a few lines of overheard diagloue; a rumination; an account of a dream; a memory.

The object here is to keep in touch with the fiction-writing impulse, and to ‘bank’ ideas and sentences, throughout a busy semester.To help you maintain this habit, your notebook entries will take the form of daily emails to me.I will not read your entries but I’ll make sure you’re making them, and prod you if you aren’t.To help me organize my inbox, please use the same subject heading for all entries:465 daily notebook.If you are emailing me for another reason, please be sure to change the subject heading.

PUBLIC READINGS Every year, the Yale Creative Writing Program brings outstanding writers to campus.You are not required, but you are strongly encouraged to take advantage of this resource.GRADING Your final grade will be based upon your attendance, participation in discussions, critical responses to your peers, and timely completion of all reading and writing assignments, including the daily ‘notebook.20 English 467b is a seminar that examines the practices, methods, ethical dilemmas, and impact of journalism.The main attention will be on investigative political reporting and writing: How others have done it, what works, and what doesn’t.

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Students will be exposed to best practices in journalism as revealed in newspaper and magazine articles and books.The course is designed not just for those considering journalism or writing as a career but for anyone hoping to enter a profession in which conveying information is central to success.Think of the seminar as a class to improve your methods for obtaining, skeptically evaluating and assessing information, and then writing it up for others to read Staking Your Claim To The 74 Billion Scholarship Bonanza.Think of the seminar as a class to improve your methods for obtaining, skeptically evaluating and assessing information, and then writing it up for others to read.

Students will read specific articles and books that will be discussed in class and analyzed in occasional short papers.I will meet or speak by phone with students individually during the term in order to provide evaluations, assistance on reporting, writing or the final project, and, if sought, career guidance Courses English.I will meet or speak by phone with students individually during the term in order to provide evaluations, assistance on reporting, writing or the final project, and, if sought, career guidance.Since this is only my fourth year teaching a formal course, it will continue to be a learning experience for me and I hope to get strong feedback from the students as the course proceeds on what is valuable to them — the readings, writing assignments, and class discussion.Some assignments may change based on student reactions and feedback.

After completing the onlineAPPLICATION FORM, upload one Word or Adobe PDF document that contains your name, the course number (e., ENGL 245), instructor’s name, a statement of purpose, a writing sample of approximately 5-10 pages or up to 4500 words of poetry, double-spaced.For the statement of purpose, please write a paragraph about why you wish to take this specific writing course.

The file should be named with the course number and your name (Sample: ENGL 245 ).Special application instructions: The seminar is open to all sophomores, juniors and seniors, and graduate students (with department approval).The application will consist of two parts.The first should be a personal statement explaining your interest in the course, your Yale class year, any previous writing courses, your main extra-curricular activities, and any journalism or work experience.The second part should be a writing sample–an article that has been published anywhere or a paper you have submitted for a class.

The application form, which is available on the English department website, should be submitted by noon on December 6. I encourage people who are writers or editors of campus publications to apply, but I also want students who have little or no experience with campus publications to apply as well.Instructor’s Biography Woodward graduated from Yale in 1965 and is currently an associate editor of The Washington Post where he has worked since 1971.He has shared in two Pulitzer Prizes, first for the Post’s coverage of the Watergate scandal with Carl Bernstein and second as the lead reporter for the Post’s coverage of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.He has authored or coauthored 18 books, all of which have been national non-fiction bestsellers.

Twelve of those have been #1 national bestsellers, ranging from All the President’s Men (1974) to Obama’s Wars (2010).In 2014, Robert Gates, former director of the CIA and Secretary of Defense, said that he wished he’d recruited Woodward into the CIA, saying of Woodward, “He has an extraordinary ability to get otherwise responsible adults to spill their guts to him…his ability to get people to talk about stuff they shouldn’t be talking about is just extraordinary and may be unique.” Gates is, of course, representing the government’s position about people telling the truth and talking about what he thinks they shouldn’t address.The class is going to be very much directed at this idea of finding out what the government and others don’t want reporters or the public to know.(See under “Full Biography” for more details and background.

) Journalism M 1:30pm-3:20pm The history and practice of writing journalistic essays or articles in which the principal actor is not a person but a notion or idea.Conventions, tropes, and authorial strategies that give rise to the best works work in the genre, focusing on examples from the 20th century, including George Orwell, Hannah Arendt, Tom Wolfe, Renata Adler, and Janet Malcolm.Students write their own example of the journalism of ideas.Spring application due by noon on December 6.After completing the onlineAPPLICATION FORM, upload one Word or Adobe PDF document that contains your name, the course number (e.

, ENGL 245), instructor’s name, a statement of purpose, a writing sample of approximately 5-10 pages or up to 4500 words of poetry, double-spaced.For the statement of purpose, please write a paragraph about why you wish to take this specific writing course.The file should be named with the course number and your name (Sample: ENGL 245 ).

Journalism For one-term senior essays, the essay itself is due in the office of the director of undergraduate studies according to the following schedule: (1) end of the fourth week of classes: five to ten pages of writing and/or an annotated bibliography; (2) end of the ninth week of classes: a rough draft of the complete essay; (3) end of the last week of classes (fall term) or end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term): the completed essay.

Consult the director of undergraduate studies regarding the schedule for submission of the yearlong senior essay.Students wishing to undertake an independent senior essay in English must apply through the office of the director of undergraduate studies.Applications are due by December 6, 2017 for spring-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the spring term and by April 20, 2018 for fall-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the fall term.For one-term senior essays, the essay itself is due in the office of the director of undergraduate studies according to the following schedule: (1) end of the fourth week of classes: five to ten pages of writing and/or an annotated bibliography; (2) end of the ninth week of classes: a rough draft of the complete essay; (3) end of the last week of classes (fall term) or end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term): the completed essay.Consult the director of undergraduate studies regarding the schedule for submission of the yearlong senior essay.

Independent Projects W 3:30pm-5:20pm This course focuses on the material culture of reading, writing, and printing from 1400 to 1900 in England and America, although students are welcome to develop their own topics based upon the Beinecke’s collections.We do hands-on research, drawing on the extraordinary collections of manuscripts and printed texts in the Beinecke.The course offers students an opportunity to explore archives and develop publishable projects relevant to their future research.Topics include theories of materiality; fetishism and relics; “persons” and “things”; the bible and the body; authorship and anonymity; writing as a material practice; the manuscript production and circulation of poetry from John Donne to Emily Dickinson; graffiti; letter-writing.Graduate Seminars W 1:30pm-3:20pm Study of literary treatments of plant life between Carl Linneaus and Charles Darwin.

Special focus on botany and gender; new systems of classification; the aesthetics of flowers in poetry and the decorative arts; the movement of plants around the globe through imperial trade and settler colonialism; medicinal and commercial uses of plants; and nascent environmentalism.Readings include poems by William Cowper, Erasmus Darwin, William Wordsworth, and Charlotte Smith; prose fiction by Daniel Defoe, Henri Bernardin de Saint-Pierre, and Johann Wyss; and samples of reference works and treatises.Opportunities for students to explore related topics through independent research.Graduate Seminars T 1:30pm-3:20pm In the eighteenth century, the novel became a popular literary form in many parts of Europe.

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Yet now-standard narratives of its “rise” often offer a temporally and linguistically foreshortened view.

This seminar examines key early modern novels in a range of European languages, centered on the dialogue between highly influential eighteenth-century British and French novels (Montesquieu, Defoe, Sterne, Diderot, Laclos, Edgeworth).We begin by considering a sixteenth-century Spanish picaresque life history (Lazarillo de Tormes) and Madame de Lafayette’s seventeenth-century secret history of French court intrigue; contemplate a key sentimental Goethe novella; and end with Romantic fiction (an Austen novel, a Kleist novella, Pushkin’s historical novel fragment) With over six million policies in an operating area of 14 states and a consistent rating of A+ (Superior) from insurance rating authority A.M. Best, we've got the kind   DC 20036 including Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Biochemistry and Chemical Technology academic year freshmen, sophomores or juniors majoring in  .We begin by considering a sixteenth-century Spanish picaresque life history (Lazarillo de Tormes) and Madame de Lafayette’s seventeenth-century secret history of French court intrigue; contemplate a key sentimental Goethe novella; and end with Romantic fiction (an Austen novel, a Kleist novella, Pushkin’s historical novel fragment).

These works raise important issues about cultural identity and historical experience, the status of women (including as readers and writers), the nature of society, the vicissitudes of knowledge—and novelistic form.We also examine several major literary-historical accounts of the novel’s generic evolution, audiences, timing, and social function, and historiographical debates about the novel’s rise (contrasting English-language accounts stressing the novel’s putatively British genesis, and alternative accounts sketching a larger European perspective).The course gives special emphasis to the improvisatory, experimental character of early modern novels, as they work to reground fiction in the details and reality of contemporary life.

Many epistolary, philosophical, sentimental, and Gothic novels present themselves as collections of “documents”—letters, diaries, travelogues, confessions—carefully assembled, impartially edited, and only incidentally conveying stories as well as information.The seminar explores these novels’ documentary ambitions; their attempt to touch, challenge, and change their readers; and their paradoxical influence on “realist” conventions (from the emergence of omniscient, impersonal narrators to techniques for describing time and place).Th 1:30pm-3:20pm Readings in the poetry and prose of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson.We study their works, careers, and contexts, including their relation to the nineteenth-century culture of verse—a topic that has been newly invigorated by “historical poetics.

” Scholarly understanding of both poets has been revised in recent years in connection with the digitization of their work, so we study the history, development, and design of the Walt Whitman Archive and the Emily Dickinson Archive.We also look at critical debates about both writers, including the long history of comment about their relation to sexuality, gender, and queerness.Graduate Seminars W 9:25am-11:15am Since the late nineteenth century, human and nonhuman voices have been technically amplified, recorded, distorted, enhanced, synthesized, and measured for purposes of art, science, and politics.This class explores classic and recent books and essays on the media of sound and culture, with a particular focus on the voice.We are guided by two fundamental questions: How do voices get into bodies and bodies into voices? How do media capture something whose existence amounts to vibrations and whose essence involves disappearance? The voice is a key but conflicted site for defining what it means to be a human being.

This complex organ or apparatus depends on lungs, brain, vocal tract, emotion, training, and culture.The voice implicates physics and music, communication and culture, anatomy and art.It raises questions about beauty, identity, power, religion, art, poetry, style, culture, race, gender, and age.Animals and machines have voices; so may the stars.M 1:30pm-3:20pm This seminar pursues close readings of Ralph Ellison’s essays, short fiction, and novels.The “in context” component of the seminar involves working from the Benston and Sundquist volumes on Ellison to discern a portrait of the modernist African America Ellison investigated, with at least Richard Wright, James Baldwin, and Romare Bearden also in view.Texts include Ellison’s Collected Essays, Flying Home and Other Stories, Invisible Man, and Juneteenth; K.Sundquist, Cultural Contexts for Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man; and A.

Nadel, Invisible Criticism: Ralph Ellison and the American Canon.20pm This course examines transformations in temporality that occurred in the sciences and arts during the twentieth century.

From the arrival of Einsteinian relativity to more contemporary proofs on quantum nonlocality, the question of time in the twentieth century threatened to overturn some of our oldest assumptions about cause and effect, duration, history, presentness, and futurity.These new temporalities were as scientifically and philosophically vexing as they were rife with spiritual and aesthetic possibility—a dynamic reflected in the literary and artistic forms that were central to these transformations.Our reading reflects this deeply cross-cultural and interdisciplinary trajectory, including histories of science and technology (Peter Galison, N.Katherine Hayles, David Kaiser), philosophies of time (Heidegger, Bruno Latour, Bernard Stiegler, McLuhan, Luhmann), critical theories of temporal form (Derrida, Adorno, Jameson, Pamela Lee, Kojin Karatani), a wide array of literary texts (William Burroughs, Thomas Pynchon, Ursula K.

Le Guin, Tom McCarthy, and others), as well as important cinematic innovations (Jodorowsky, Godard, Kubrick).

What is the “time” of literature? of film? How does art transform or reinforce theories of temporal flow? How do new technologies of composition and circulation alter the temporal effects of a given work? What was the “End of History”? Graduate Seminars M 1:30pm-3:20pm Recent efforts to defend and renovate the critical humanities—reparative reading, surface reading, postcritique, and so on—have made a watchword of attention.It is said that the best reading practices are characterized not by the canons they build or by the theories they develop but by the styles of receptivity they cultivate.The study of the arts is coming to be understood as a kind of therapy, the antidote to mass distraction, and as an ethics, a way of becoming more humble and more humane.This seminar explores what is gained and what is lost when criticism takes disciplined attentiveness as its norm.We begin with an overview of contemporary debates about the hermeneutics of suspicion and its alternatives (Sedgwick, Hayles, Best and Marcus, Love, Felski).

We move on to piece together a partial genealogy of attentiveness, taking a special interest in questions of secularism and secularity, from classical and medieval spiritual exercises through romanticism and modernism (Benjamin, Weil, Crary, Foucault, Hadot).We conclude with an extended reading of a key text, Henry Thoreau’s Walden (1854), drawing from historical and critical sources to consider Thoreau’s ideas about strenuous reading, ascetic self-culture, and an ethics of openness to the world.Graduate Seminars M 9:25am-11:15am This course surveys political theories of gender/sexuality through attention to citizenship, the nation-state, rights discourses, civil society, migration, biopolitics, criminality, security, and social death.The course looks to establish a foundational understanding of the conjunctures between liberal governance and the regulation of reproductive, sexual, and family life.At the same time, our wider conceptual arc takes up more recent critical debates on the entanglements of sexual intimacy, race, and national belonging.

Textual selections move across a variety of disciplines, including anthropology, sociology, history, literature, critical race theory, queer theory, indigenous studies, environmental studies, and law.Key authors include Hobbes, Locke, Marx, Engels, Habermas, Arendt, Foucault, Orlando Patterson, C.Macpherson, Wendy Brown, Ann Laura Stoler, Saidiya Hartman, Joan Wallach Scott, Cheryl Harris, Lauren Berlant, Michael Warner, Jasbir Puar, Elizabeth Povinelli, Paul Gilroy, Pheng Cheah, Inderpal Grewal, Frank Wilderson, Salamishah Tillet, Achille Mbembe, Adriana Petryna, Lisa Marie Cacho, Mark Rifkin, Jos Mu oz, Dean Spade, Lisa Lowe, Talal Asad.